Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Syrian Refugee Family Arrives In New Jersey To Start New Life

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Bombing At Turkish Wedding Raises Questions About Country's Stability

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A volunteer at the the Dar-ul-Islam mosque in Elizabeth, N.J., prepares for a party to welcome refugees. More than 50 newly arrived Syrian women and children were invited to the party. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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At A New Jersey Mosque, People Of Different Faiths Welcome Syrians

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Syrian Refugees Get Oriented To The Ways Of American Life

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Najla cooks for Syria Day at Global Grace Café at the Reformed Church of Highland Park in New Jersey. Najla is from Syria and arrived in the U.S. 10 months ago with her husband and daughter after the United Arab Emirates canceled a residency permit, ending her job at an insurance company. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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As U.S. Politicians Shun Syrian Refugees, Religious Groups Embrace Them

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Marie Colvin, shown here in London in November 2010, was killed in Homs, Syria, on Feb. 22, 2012, along with photographer Remi Ochlik. She lost her left eye after being hit by shrapnel while covering the civil war in Sri Lanka in 2001. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Lawsuit Targets Syrian Regime In Journalist's Killing

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Obama Visits Saudi Arabia Amid Tensions With Gulf Leaders

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A replica of Palmyra's 2,000-year-old Arch of Triumph is constructed in London's Trafalgar Square on Monday. The arch, a replica of a monument demolished by ISIS, was made using 3-D imaging produced from photographs. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Saudi artist Abdulnasser Gharem poses in front of "Generation Kill," a piece made with rubber stamps, digital print and paint, at the opening night of his exhibition titled Al Sahwa (The Awakening) at Ayyam gallery in Dubai in 2014. Aya Batrawy/AP hide caption

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Aya Batrawy/AP

A New Generation Of Saudi Artists Pushes The Boundaries

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Behind The Scenes: One Story From The Prison Swap With Iran

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Saudi Arabia's King Salman (left) speaks with his son Mohammed in the capital Riyadh in 2012. The king was the crown prince at the time. When he assumed the throne last year, Salman named Mohammed, now 30, the deputy crown prince and defense minister. They have pursued a much more aggressive foreign policy in the region, particularly when it comes to confronting Iran. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

President Obama meets Saudi Arabia's King Salman in Riyadh in January 2015. The Saudi monarch, in power for a year, has adopted more confrontational positions toward Iran, the kingdom's longtime rival. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Under King Salman, Saudi Arabia Takes A Harder Line With Iran

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A veiled woman and a man embrace in this work by Mohammed Labban at the recent art exhibition "LoudArt," an annual event in the Saudi Arabian city of Jeddah. The exhibit, curated by a woman, often challenges conservative traditions in the kingdom. Deborah Amos / NPR hide caption

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In Ways Big And Small, Saudi Arabian Women Are 'Pushing Normal'

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Migrants Still Leave Turkey For Europe But Winter Makes The Trip More Difficult

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