Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
Deborah Amos
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Deborah Amos

Deborah Amos
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Deborah Amos

International Correspondent

Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

In 2009, Amos won the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting from Georgetown University and in 2010 was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Lifetime Achievement Award by Washington State University. Amos was part of a team of reporters who won a 2004 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for coverage of Iraq. A Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1991-1992, Amos returned to Harvard in 2010 as a Shorenstein Fellow at the Kennedy School.

In 2003, Amos returned to NPR after a decade in television news, including ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight, and the PBS programs NOW with Bill Moyers and Frontline.

When Amos first came to NPR in 1977, she worked first as a director and then a producer for Weekend All Things Considered until 1979. For the next six years, she worked on radio documentaries, which won her several significant honors. In 1982, Amos received the Prix Italia, the Ohio State Award, and a DuPont-Columbia Award for "Father Cares: The Last of Jonestown," and in 1984 she received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "Refugees."

From 1985 until 1993, Amos spend most of her time at NPR reporting overseas, including as the London Bureau Chief and as an NPR foreign correspondent based in Amman, Jordan. During that time, Amos won several awards, including a duPont-Columbia Award and a Breakthru Award, and widespread recognition for her coverage of the Gulf War in 1991.

A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Amos is also the author of Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East (Public Affairs, 2010) and Lines in the Sand: Desert Storm and the Remaking of the Arab World (Simon and Schuster, 1992).

Amos is a Ferris Professor at Princeton, where she teaches journalism during the fall term.

Amos began her career after receiving a degree in broadcasting from the University of Florida at Gainesville.

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Story Archive

As Lebanon's Economy Worsens, Protests Turn More Violent

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Lebanon Protests Turn Violent As Government And Economy Remain In Collapse

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Killing Of Iranian General Sparks Reaction Around The World

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Why Are Syrian War Crimes Being Prosecuted In Germany?

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Omar Alshogre, a Syrian refugee who was tortured as a political prisoner in Syria, now lives in Sweden. He has framed photos of men who he says tortured him that he keeps upside down. Axel Öberg for NPR hide caption

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How Syrians Who Fled Their Country Are Pursuing Justice After Torture From The Regime

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Survivor Of Torture In Syria's Prisons Is Telling His Story

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Documents Smuggled Out Of Syria Being Used To Build War Crimes Cases Against Regime

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German Group Aims To Use Soccer To Empower Female Athletes

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Ursula von der Leyen, then Germany's defense minister, reads in 2014 with 1st Lt. Patrick Schumitz and his son, Oskar, during a nursery opening at the University of the Federal Armed Forces, Munich. During a previous stint running Germany's family ministry, von der Leyen, a mother of seven, instituted new child care and parental leave policies. Christoph Stache/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Few German Mothers Go Back To Work Full Time. These Are The Challenges They Face

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In Germany, Working Mothers Say They Face Job Discrimination

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