Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
Deborah Amos
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Deborah Amos

Deborah Amos
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Deborah Amos

International Correspondent

Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

In 2009, Amos won the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting from Georgetown University and in 2010 was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Lifetime Achievement Award by Washington State University. Amos was part of a team of reporters who won a 2004 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for coverage of Iraq. A Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1991-1992, Amos returned to Harvard in 2010 as a Shorenstein Fellow at the Kennedy School.

In 2003, Amos returned to NPR after a decade in television news, including ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight, and the PBS programs NOW with Bill Moyers and Frontline.

When Amos first came to NPR in 1977, she worked first as a director and then a producer for Weekend All Things Considered until 1979. For the next six years, she worked on radio documentaries, which won her several significant honors. In 1982, Amos received the Prix Italia, the Ohio State Award, and a DuPont-Columbia Award for "Father Cares: The Last of Jonestown," and in 1984 she received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "Refugees."

From 1985 until 1993, Amos spend most of her time at NPR reporting overseas, including as the London Bureau Chief and as an NPR foreign correspondent based in Amman, Jordan. During that time, Amos won several awards, including a duPont-Columbia Award and a Breakthru Award, and widespread recognition for her coverage of the Gulf War in 1991.

A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Amos is also the author of Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East (Public Affairs, 2010) and Lines in the Sand: Desert Storm and the Remaking of the Arab World (Simon and Schuster, 1992).

Amos is a Ferris Professor at Princeton, where she teaches journalism during the fall term.

Amos began her career after receiving a degree in broadcasting from the University of Florida at Gainesville.

Story Archive

Witnesses Of Alleged War Crimes In Syria Testify Despite Feeling They're In Danger

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Volunteers and trainees with the group Bikeygees at a park in Berlin in July. The organization teaches refugee women in Germany how to ride bikes. Trainee Shapol Bakir-Rasoul, a refugee from Iraq, holds up a Bikeygees sign with founder Annette Krüger, right. Behind them in yellow is volunteer Shaha Khalef, a refugee from Iraq. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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'A Beautiful Feeling': Refugee Women In Germany Learn The Joy Of Riding Bikes

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German Bike Program Helps Refugee Women Acclimate To New Community

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A Hard-Line Jewish Nationalist Is Accused Of Stoking Anger Between Jews And Arabs

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Israeli Comedy Writer Discusses Satire In Post-Netanyahu Era

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Jisr al-Zarqa is home to Palestinian citizens of Israel and one of the poorest parts of the country. Fatma Tanis/NPR hide caption

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Palestinians Hope A New Israeli Government Means Progress For This Poor Town

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Palestinians May Be Evicted From Jerusalem Neighborhood To Make Way For Biblical Park

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3 Days After A New Governnent Is Installed, Israel Strikes Gaza Targets

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Israeli Nationalist March Through Jerusalem Has Heightened Tensions Further

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Naftali Bennett Is Sworn In As Israel's New Prime Minister

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Israel Poised To End Prime Minister Netanyahu's Rule In Vote

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