Chris Arnold Chris Arnold is a correspondent with NPR's investigations team. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
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Chris Arnold

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Chris Arnold 2016
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Chris Arnold

Correspondent, Investigations

Chris Arnold is a correspondent with NPR's investigations team. His stories often focus on people who are being mistreated and need help. Recently he's been reporting on election officials and workers around the country who are being targeted with threats and harassment fueled by Donald Trump's false claims about voter fraud and rigged elections.

Arnold was honored with a 2017 George Foster Peabody Award for his coverage of the Wells Fargo banking scandal. His stories sparked a Senate inquiry into the bank's treatment of employees who tried to blow the whistle on the wrongdoing.

His series of stories "The Trouble with TEACH Grants," that he reported from 2018 - 2020 with NPR's Cory Turner, exposed a debacle at the U.S. Department of Education through which public school teachers had grants unfairly converted into large student loan debts — some upwards of $20,000. As a result of the stories, members of Congress demanded reforms and the Education Department overhauled the program and is now giving thousands of teachers their grant money back and erasing their debts. The stories won a 2020 Edward R. Murrow Award.

Arnold was chosen for a Nieman Journalism Fellowship at Harvard University during the 2012-2013 academic year. He joined a small group of other journalists from the U.S. and abroad and studied economics, leadership and the future of journalism in the digital age. Arnold also taught Radio Journalism as a Lecturer at Yale University for 4 years prior to the pandemic.

In addition to reporting for NPR's flagship radio programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, Arnold was on the creative team that started NPR's Life Kit podcast. He has hosted many of its personal finance episodes which offer listeners actionable tips backed up by behavioral economics research on the best ways to save money, invest for the future and a range of other topics.

Arnold won the 2016 Gerald Loeb Award, which honors work that informs and protects the private investor and the general public, for a series of stories about financial firms charging excessive fees in retirement accounts — fees that siphon billions of dollars annually from Americans trying to save for the future.

Arnold also won the National Association of Consumer Advocates Award for Investigative Journalism for a series of stories he reported with ProPublica that exposed improper debt collection practices by non-profit hospitals who were suing thousands of their low-income patients.

Following the 2008 financial crisis and collapse of the housing market, Arnold reported on problems within the nation's largest banks that led to the banks improperly foreclosing on thousands of American homeowners. For this work, Arnold earned a 2011 Edward R. Murrow Award for the special series, "The Foreclosure Nightmare." He's also been honored with the Newspaper Guild's 2009 Heywood Broun Award for broadcast journalism.

Over his career at NPR, Arnold has covered a range of subjects — from Katrina recovery in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, to immigrant workers in the fishing industry, to a new kind of table saw that won't cut your fingers off. He traveled to Turin, Italy, for NPR's coverage of the 2006 Winter Olympics. He has also followed the dramatic rise in the numbers of teenagers abusing the powerful and highly addictive painkiller Oxycontin.

In the days and months following the Sept. 11 attacks, Arnold reported from New York and contributed to the NPR coverage that won the Overseas Press Club and the George Foster Peabody Awards. He chronicled the recovery effort at Ground Zero, focusing on members of the Port Authority Police department as they struggled with the deaths of 37 officers — the greatest loss of any police department in U.S. history.

Prior to his move to Boston, Arnold traveled the country for NPR doing feature stories on entrepreneurship. His pieces covered technologists, farmers and family business owners. He also reported on efforts to kindle entrepreneurship in economically disadvantaged areas ranging from inner-city Los Angeles to the Pine Ridge Indian reservation in South Dakota.

Arnold has worked in public radio since 1993. Before joining NPR, he was a freelance reporter working out of San Francisco's NPR Member Station, KQED.

Story Archive

Friday

'Zombie mortgages' threaten thousands of homeowners, an NPR investigation finds

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Thursday

Why Zombie second mortgages are threatening thousands of Americans' homes

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Friday

Karen McDonough sits inside her home in Quincy, Massachusetts. Vanessa Leroy for NPR hide caption

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Vanessa Leroy for NPR

Tuesday

VA fixes a home loan debacle, but many vets who were affected won't get help

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Thursday

Edmund Garcia, an Iraq War veteran, stands outside his home in Rosharon, Texas. Like many vets, he was told if he took a mortgage forbearance, his monthly payments wouldn't go up afterward. Joseph Bui for NPR hide caption

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Joseph Bui for NPR

Tuesday

Tom Noffsinger stands in his garage workshop, where he uses a SawStop table saw for woodworking at his home in Raleigh, North Carolina. About 20 years ago, Noffsinger had a table saw accident and almost lost his thumb. Cornell Watson for NPR hide caption

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Cornell Watson for NPR

Saturday

Edmund Garcia, an Iraq war veteran, holds the American flag over his shoulder outside his home on Thursday in Rosharon, Texas. Joseph Bui for NPR hide caption

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Joseph Bui for NPR

Friday

The VA home loan debacle continues, and now lawmakers are laying on the pressure

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Thursday

Friday

A home for sale sign on Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2024, in Kennesaw, Ga. On Friday, the National Association of Realtors reported that 2023 saw the smallest number of home sales in nearly 30 years. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

Friday

Marine Corps veteran Ed O'Connor is seen outside his home in Fredericksburg, Va. He is among tens of thousands of veterans who took a COVID forbearance on a VA home loan. But the VA's program ended abruptly in October of 2022 and many veterans were asked to either pay all the missed payments or face foreclosure. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Veterans fear the VA's new foreclosure rescue plan won't help them

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Tuesday

The VA stops foreclosures for thousands of veterans after NPR investigation

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Saturday

The Department of Veterans Affairs halts foreclosures after NPR investigation

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Friday

Charles Dharapak/AP

VA halts foreclosures for thousands of veterans about to needlessly lose their homes

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Wednesday

Saturday

The Queens are hoping the VA does pause foreclosures until the new program can offer people help. Michael Noble Jr. for NPR hide caption

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Michael Noble Jr. for NPR

Thousands of veterans face foreclosure and it's not their fault. The VA could help

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Friday

Sunday

In the face of threats, election workers say they feel unsafe doing their jobs

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Friday

Death threats and harassment: 2024 election workers already are scared

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Wednesday

A car plastered in stickers reading "Trump Won" drives through Coos Bay, Ore. Wesley Lapointe for NPR hide caption

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Wesley Lapointe for NPR

For election workers, Trump's lies have meant threats, harassment and a poisoned dog

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Tuesday

Election workers are already being threatened. They're worried about 2024

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Monday

Arin Yoon for NPR/NPR

A deal's a deal...unless it's a 'yo-yo' car sale

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Tuesday

How car buyers can become entrapped in what's known as a 'yo-yo' sale

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Saturday

Kaitlyn Arland drives in her car in Junction City, Kan. Two years ago, when she tried to buy her first car, the dealership called her back and demanded she sign a new deal with a higher down payment after she had taken the car home. This tactic is often referred to as a yo-yo deal. Arin Yoon for NPR hide caption

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Arin Yoon for NPR

Even after you think you bought a car, dealerships can 'yo-yo' you and take it back

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