Chris Arnold NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
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Chris Arnold

Sustained Lower Gas Prices Could Drive Economic Growth

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U.S. Gas Prices Continue To Slide Downward

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Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America CEO Bruce Marks is offering the first batch of these "wealth building home loans" to homebuyers through his nonprofit organization. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

New 15-Year Mortgage May Open Homeownership Door For More Buyers

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PIMCO's 'Bond King' Quits Amid Reports Of Erratic Behavior

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Conrad Goetzinger and Cassandra Rose struggle to pay their bills as $760 is garnished from their paychecks every two weeks by debt collectors. Twice, Goetzinger's bank account has been emptied by collectors after he failed to payoff a loan for a laptop. Eric Francis/AP for ProPublica hide caption

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Eric Francis/AP for ProPublica

With Debt Collection, Your Bank Account Could Be At Risk

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Kevin Evans relaxes in his small apartment after arriving home from work. Evans, who lost income and his home in the recession, is now having his wages garnished after falling behind on his credit card payments. Colin E. Braley/AP for ProPublica hide caption

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Colin E. Braley/AP for ProPublica

Millions Of Americans' Wages Seized Over Credit Card And Medical Debt

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Mel Watt, director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, says many homeowners who could qualify to refinance their mortgages under HARP are suspicious. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Many Homeowners Still Qualify For Mortgage Relief

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Some Public Pension Funds Making Big Bets On Hedge Funds

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In June Jobs Numbers, Signs For Optimism

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T-Mobile Accused Of Billing Customers With Bogus Fees

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Homebuilding remains slumped at levels not seen since WWII. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Mike Groll/AP

Housing Market Fake-Outs Stump Economists

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Marissa Szabo, 26, and her boyfriend are moving into Szabo's mother's house. The couple is saving up for a down payment. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Sluggish Housing Market A Product Of Millions Of 'Missing Households'

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