Chris Arnold NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Saving For Retirement? Here's A Tip

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Lobsterman Genevieve Kurilec holds a lobster caught while fishing along Deer Isle, Maine. Kurilec says more women are beginning to captain their own lobster boats. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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She's No Man; She's A Lobsterman

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New Terms Set For Fannie And Freddie

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Sara Millan (left) thanks Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America CEO Bruce Marks after NACA was able to reduce her family's mortgage during an event in Los Angeles in September 2010. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Persuading Banks To Give Homeowners A Break

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Consumer Bureau Targets Improper Floreclosures

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As lobster prices plunge, scallops offer fishermen an alternative to make money. Levi Bridges for NPR hide caption

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Levi Bridges for NPR

Maine Lobstermen Give Farming Sea Scallops A Try

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Economists Cautiously Applaud Jobs Report

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Many experts say reducing mortgage principal can help troubled homeowners avoid foreclosure and stay in their homes. But the regulator who oversees two of the nation's largest mortgage holders, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, has rejected the idea. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

June Brought 80,000 Jobs, 8.2 Percent Unemployment

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Sales Tax In Health Law Targets Medical Devices

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Created by the federal government during the Great Depression, Fannie Mae became a Washington powerhouse: a highly profitable, private company, protected by the government and boasting huge lobbying clout. But today, Fannie Mae has essentially become a ward of the state. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Morale Takes A Hit At Beleaguered Fannie, Freddie

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Credit Rating Agency Moody's Downgrades 15 Banks

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The housing market is finally showing signs of a comeback, according to an annual study from Harvard. But, though mortgage interest rates are at record lows, banks are often too cautious to lend. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Will Credit Be The Spoiler In Housing Recovery?

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Americans' Net Worth Has Plummeted, Report Shows

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Srinivas Konanki and his wife own a small laboratory device company near Boston. Concerns about the economy have left them wary of hiring new employees. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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As Economic Headwinds Pick Up, Employers Lie Low

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