Chris Arnold NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
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Chris Arnold

Neil Barofsky, special inspector general for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, testifies before Congress. He will step down from his position in March. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Real estate professionals worry that cutting the mortgage tax deduction could put a damper on homeownership. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

What Does Dow 12,000 Mean For The Economy?

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The Goldman Sachs booth on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Goldman's Double Hit: Profit Slide, Facebook Gaffe

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Post Tax Credit, Housing Prices Slide Further

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Faulty paperwork on millions of outstanding mortgages may push banks to work out alternatives to keep more people in their homes. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Jobs Report Is Good News, But Not Good Enough?

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Brothers Michael (left) and Timothy Martens inspect copper machine parts on the factory floor of M&H Engineering. The company has hired back some workers who were laid off during the recession. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Back On The Job? New Hires Come With Jitters

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