Chris Arnold NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
Chris Arnold 2016 square
Stories By

Chris Arnold

Regulators Propose New Rules For Mortgage Market

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/134974407/134974454" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman walks past a Wells Fargo Home Mortgage office in La Habra, Calif. Many mortgage brokers say the Federal Reserve's new rules favor big banks. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jae C. Hong/AP

A foreclosed house for sale in the Detroit suburb of Southfield, Mich. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Osorio/AP

The cooling towers of Three Mile Island's Unit 1 plant pour steam into the sky in Middletown, Pa. In 1979, Three Mile Island's Unit 2 nuclear power plant was the scene of the nation's worst commercial nuclear accident. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP

Joe Pelton operates a computer-controlled machine that drills a tiny hole into a needle that is used to make microchips. He works at AccuRounds, an advanced manufacturing facility in Avon, Mass. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Arnold/NPR

Neil Barofsky, special inspector general for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, testifies before Congress. He will step down from his position in March. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Neil Barofsky, special inspector general for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, testifies before Congress. He will step down from his position in March. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Real estate professionals worry that cutting the mortgage tax deduction could put a damper on homeownership. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gene J. Puskar/AP

What Does Dow 12,000 Mean For The Economy?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133293515/133293503" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Goldman Sachs booth on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Goldman's Double Hit: Profit Slide, Facebook Gaffe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133058815/133058788" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript