Chris Arnold NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
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SawStop, a table saw safety tool, senses an electrical current in skin and triggers a brake when a finger comes into contact with the blade. Courtesy of SawStop hide caption

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Courtesy of SawStop

One proposal for saving homeowners money is to have government-backed firms Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac extend their loan guarantees to cover new, cheaper, refinanced loans. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

A worker sweeps in front of a Bank of America branch in Chicago. On Monday, the bank announced plans to lay off 30,000 employees, or about 10 percent of its staff, over the next few years. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Retired Port Authority Police officers Brian Patrick Tierney (left) and Kevin Devlin visited the World Trade Center site this week. Both men say it's been a struggle to adjust to normal life after losing friends and searching for remains at Ground Zero. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

The Wiffle Ball headquarters in Shelton, Conn. Every Wiffle Ball is made in the U.S. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

Wiffle Ball: Born And Still Made In The USA

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Big Banks Sued Over Risky Mortgages

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Irene destroyed much of the two-mile boardwalk in Spring Lake, N.J. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

Near record low mortgage rates are good news for the few who can afford to buy a home or are able to refinance. But the rates have done little to lift the ailing housing market. Bill Sikes/AP hide caption

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Bill Sikes/AP

Low Rates Alone Not Seen Reviving Housing Market

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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday. Wall Street is in the midst of the biggest stock sell-off since the financial crisis a few years ago. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images
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Debt's Impact Could Be Worse If Interest Rates Rise

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