Chris Arnold NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
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Chris Arnold

Kevin Dole works from home next to his wife's bureau and near his drum set in the couple's small two-bedroom condo in Nashville, Tennessee. Chelsea Fitzgerald-Dole hide caption

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Chelsea Fitzgerald-Dole

Home prices could fall in some U.S. cities. Here's where and why

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Rising home prices are leading to fears of a new housing bubble

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Mortgage rates on 30-year, fixed-rate loans rose above 5% this week. That's pushing the cost of buying a home higher and making homeownership unaffordable for more people. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Mortgage rates just hit 5%. Here's how much more expensive that makes home ownership

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Builder Emerson Claus and his foreman Rene Landeverde at the site of an apartment they are building in a suburb of Boston. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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There's never been such a severe shortage of homes in the U.S. Here's why

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Encore: In the U.S., there's a historic shortage of homes — around 3 million short

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In the U.S., there's a historic shortage of homes — around 3 million short

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We are well into 2022. How is your New Year's budget resolution going?

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The floor of the New York Stock Exchange this week, after the Federal Reserve announced a quarter-point hike in its key interest rate. The Fed is raising rates to curb inflation, but that will hit some Americans in their wallets. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Americans will feel the impact as Fed raises rates. Here's what you should know

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Argenis Dominguez fueling up his SUV at a gas station in Boston. He drives Uber for a living and says the higher gas prices mean less money in his pocket. Chris Arnold hide caption

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Chris Arnold

Record gas prices hit working class Americans with inflation already surging

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Americans on low incomes are hit harder by high gas prices due to the war in Ukraine

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Sanctions could push Russia into a financial crisis and depression

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Susan DeFrance retired two years ago and moved to a mobile home park on the ocean to cut expenses. Now with inflation, she's worried about outliving her savings. Susan DeFrance hide caption

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Susan DeFrance

Inflation has many retirees worried about outliving their savings

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