Chris Arnold NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
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Gary Gensler, President Biden's pick to head the Securities and Exchange Commission, arrives to testify on Capitol Hill back in 2012. Gensler won over many skeptics by pushing through tough reforms after the financial crisis when he ran the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Wall Street Insider Turned Tough Market Cop: Biden's Pick To Head SEC

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Biden Picks Gary Gensler To Head SEC

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Tenants' rights advocates protesting evictions during the pandemic in Boston this month. They want the Biden administration to not only extend, but also strengthen, an eviction order from the CDC aimed at keeping people in their homes during the outbreak. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

There's plenty of social distance out on the slopes, but resorts are requiring masks in lift lines and lodges and limiting lodge use. Most skiers and boarders are happy to comply but Schweitzer Mountain in Idaho had to suspend season passes for some who refused to wear masks and were verbally abusive to lift line attendants. Schweitzer Mountain Resort hide caption

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Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Ski Down and Mask Up — Resorts Try To Stay Safe In Pandemic Skiing Boom

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The drilling rig Polar Pioneer outfits for Arctic oil exploration in 2015. A proposed rule from the Trump administration would force banks to offer financing to oil companies, gun-makers and high-cost payday lenders, even if the banks don't want to. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Trump Regulator's Rule Would Force Banks To Lend To Gun-Makers And Oil Drillers

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A protester holds up an eviction-related sign in Washington, D.C. The coronavirus rescue package just passed in Congress sets aside $25 billion for rental assistance and extends a CDC order aimed at preventing evictions. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

COVID-19 Relief Bill Could Stave Off Historic Wave Of Evictions

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Housing activists protest evictions in Massachusetts, which recently allowed its sweeping statewide eviction ban to expire. That leaves residents with only a much weaker eviction protection order from the Centers for Disease Control and prevention. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Why The CDC Eviction Ban Isn't Really A Ban: 'I Have Nowhere To Go'

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Sen. Mark Warner speaks alongside a bipartisan group of lawmakers as they announce a proposal for a $908 billion coronavirus relief bill on Tuesday. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Millions Face Bitter Winter If Congress Fails To Extend Relief Programs

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With Relief Programs Expiring Soon, Millions Of Americans Expect A Difficult Winter

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Housing activists gather in Swampscott, Mass., in October to call on the state's governor to support more robust protections against evictions and foreclosures during the pandemic. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

More Americans Pay Rent On Credit Cards As Lawmakers Fail To Pass Relief Bill

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A for sale sign is displayed in front of a house in Westwood, Mass. Home prices hit a new record in October as the number of homes for sale hit an all-time low. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP