Chris Arnold NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
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Chris Arnold 2016
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Chris Arnold

Correspondent

NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition. He joined NPR in 1996, and was based in San Francisco before moving to Boston in 2001.

Most recently, Arnold has been reporting on financial challenges facing millions of working and middle class Americans as the economy continues to recover from the worst recession in generations.

Arnold was honored with a 2017 George Foster Peabody Award for his coverage of the Wells Fargo banking scandal. His stories sparked a Senate inquiry into the bank's treatment of employees who tried to blow the whistle on the wrongdoing. Arnold also won the National Association of Consumer Advocates award for Investigative Journalism for a series of stories he reported with ProPublica that exposed improper debt collection practices by non-profit hospitals who were suing thousands of their low-income patients.

Arnold is now serving as the lead reporter and editor for the ongoing NPR series "Your Money and Your Life", which explores personal finance issues. As part of that, he's reporting on the problem of Wall Street firms charging excessive fees in retirement accounts: fees that siphon billions of dollars annually from Americans trying to save for the future. For this series, Arnold won the 2016 Gerald Loeb Award which honors work that informs and protects the private investor and the general public. UCLA calls the award the most prestigious in financial journalism.

Following the 2008 financial crisis and collapse of the housing market, Arnold reported on problems within the nation's largest banks that led to the banks improperly foreclosing on thousands of American homeowners. For this work, Arnold earned a 2011 Edward R. Murrow Award for the special series, The Foreclosure Nightmare. He's also been honored with the Newspaper Guild's 2009 Heywood Broun Award for broadcast journalism. And he was a finalist for the Scripps Howard Foundation's National Journalism Award.

Arnold was chosen for a Nieman Journalism Fellowship at Harvard University during the 2012-2013 academic year. He joined a small group of other journalists from the U.S. and abroad and studied economics, leadership, and the future of journalism in the digital age. Arnold also teaches Radio Journalism as a Lecturer at Yale University. And he was named a Poynter Fellow by Yale in 2016.

Over his career at NPR, Arnold has covered a range of other subjects – from Katrina recovery in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, to immigrant workers in the fishing industry, to a new kind of table saw that won't cut your fingers off. He traveled to Turin, Italy, for NPR's coverage of the 2006 Winter Olympics. He has also followed the dramatic rise in the numbers of teenagers abusing the powerful and highly addictive painkiller Oxycontin.

In the days and months following the September 11, 2001, attacks, Arnold reported from New York and contributed to the NPR coverage that won the Overseas Press Club and the George Foster Peabody Awards. He chronicled the recovery effort at Ground Zero, focusing on members of the Port Authority Police department, as they struggled with the deaths of 37 officers—the greatest loss of any police department in U.S. history.

Prior to his move to Boston, Arnold traveled the country for NPR doing feature stories on entrepreneurship. His pieces covered technologists, farmers, and family business owners. He also reported on efforts to kindle entrepreneurship in economically disadvantaged areas ranging from inner-city Los Angeles to the Pine Ridge Indian reservation in South Dakota.

Arnold has worked in public radio since 1993. Before joining NPR, he was a freelance reporter working out of San Francisco's NPR Member Station, KQED.

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Mick Mulvaney Faces Lawmakers

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Mick Mulvaney was appointed by President Trump as acting head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. As a congressman, Mulvaney sponsored legislation to abolish the agency. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Face-Off: Elizabeth Warren Vs. Trump's Consumer Watchdog, Mick Mulvaney

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Traders and financial professionals work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange ahead of the opening bell. Investors' worries about a trade war increased Wednesday after China announced plans to retaliate against U.S. tariffs. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Trade Tariffs And Tech Sector Worries Bring Down Stocks

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Mick Mulvaney, interim director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, wants to give Congress prior approval of any major new rules created by the bureau. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Teachers In High-Need Areas Are Now Saddled With Debt

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The TEACH grant helps teachers-to-be pay for college or a master's. But many teachers, like Maggie Webb (left) and David West, say when they began teaching, they were forced to pay it back. Kayana Szymczak and Sean Rayford for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak and Sean Rayford for NPR

Dept. Of Education Fail: Teachers Lose Grants, Forced To Repay Thousands In Loans

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February Jobs Report Was So Good, It Caught Many Economists Off Guard

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Education Department Wants To Protect Student Loan Debt Collectors

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Proposed cuts in funding for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau come amid questions about Trump appointee Mick Mulvaney softening the agency's stance on payday lenders. Joshua Roberts/Reuters hide caption

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Trump Administration's Latest Strike On CFPB: Budget Cuts

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How Mick Mulvaney Is Changing The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

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Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney is also the interim director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump Administration Plans To Defang Consumer Protection Watchdog

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Fed Hits Wells Fargo With Penalty For 'Widespread Consumer Abuses'

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