Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a Washington-based correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She has reported extensively on the coronavirus pandemic since it began, providing near-daily coverage of new developments and effects. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour and is one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Nineteen children and two adults were killed during the shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Parents are struggling to cope with the loss and with how to explain it to their children. Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images

Talking to kids after a school shooting

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The infant formula shortage is the focus of 2 Capitol Hill hearings

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A factory in Illinois has an innovative approach to employee wellness

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A COVID Memorial Project installation in September, 2020 marked 200,000 lives lost in the COVID-19 pandemic. The official death toll in the U.S. is on the cusp of a million. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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How Vaccine Misinformation Spread Through The Parenting World

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How vaccine misinformation made the COVID-19 death toll worse

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Scientists explore why some COVID long-haulers develop multiple health issues

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FDA proposes menthol cigarette ban

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The Food and Drug Administration says its proposal to ban menthol cigarettes has the potential to significantly decrease disease and death from tobacco by "reducing youth experimentation and addiction." Here, menthol cigarettes and other tobacco products are on sale at a San Francisco store in 2018. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Moderna requests FDA authorization for its COVID vaccine for very young kids

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A medical worker administers tests at a Covid-19 testing site in New York City. New York City and other places in the Northeast are seeing an uptick in infection numbers. Spencer Platt / Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt / Getty Images

People 60 years and older should not start taking daily aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes. Those currently taking it, can consult their doctors about whether to continue. Emma H. Tobin/AP hide caption

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Emma H. Tobin/AP

Health officials say a rise in COVID cases looks more like a ripple than a wave

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Millions of Americans have irritable bowel syndrome and the stress of the past two years may have exacerbated stomach issues. There are ways to help, including meditation and practicing mindfulness. Alvaro Tejero/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Pandemic anxiety was hard on IBS patients. Here's how to find relief

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US President Joe Biden receives a second booster shot of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine a day after the US authorized a fourth dose of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna Covid-19 vaccines for people 50 and older NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP via Getty Images