Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour and is one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Supplies Of COVID-19 Vaccines Vary In Parts Of The U.S.

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Some Colleges Are Mandating COVID-19 Vaccines — But At What Cost?

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A pharmacy technician fills syringes of COVID-19 vaccines at Whitney M. Young Elementary School in Louisville, Kentucky. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Vaccinations Are Up, But So Are COVID-19 Cases

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Despite Increased Vaccinations, COVID-19 Cases Remain High

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CDC Says Travel Is Safe 2 Weeks After Getting A Final COVID-19 Vaccine Dose

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Vaccination Pace Increases But So Does Rate Of New COVID-19 Cases

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Despite More Vaccinations, Pockets Of COVID-19 Cases Increase

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Jeevan Guha, 6, offers a view of pandemic-era schooling with this homemade sign in San Francisco. The sign reads, "I miss my school." Yalonda M. James/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Yalonda M. James/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

CDC Says Schools Can Now Space Students 3 Feet Apart, Rather Than 6

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Biden Announced A $12 Billion Plan For COVID-19 Testing In Schools, A Pricey Endeavor

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Even with some colleges canceling their midsemester breaks due to COVID-19, students from more than 200 schools are expected to visit Miami Beach during spring break, which runs until mid-April. Eva Marie Uzcatequi/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcatequi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Planning A Spring Break? These 5 Tips Can Help Minimize Risk

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued its first set of recommendations for fully vaccinated people. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

CDC's Do's and Don'ts For Fully Vaccinated People

The CDC released new guidance Monday, allowing people fully vaccinated against COVID-19 to resume some pre-pandemic activities, including gathering indoors with other vaccinated people without wearing masks. Health correspondent Allison Aubrey walks us through the new recommendations and what precautions fully vaccinated people still need to take.

CDC's Do's and Don'ts For Fully Vaccinated People

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The CDC Says That Fully Vaccinated People Can Return To Some Pre-Pandemic Activities

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As the U.S. accelerates its rollout of COVID-19 vaccines, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday released new guidance for individuals who have been fully inoculated. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

As Vaccinations Continue, COVID-19 Cases Plateau. Is Progress Stalled?

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