Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour.

Aubrey is a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. Along with her colleagues on The Salt, Aubrey is winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. She was also a nominee for a James Beard Award in 2013 for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was also a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

A sample of cannabidiol (CBD) oil is dropped into water. Supplements containing the marijuana extract are popular and widely sold as remedies for a variety of ailments and aches. But scientific evidence that they work hasn't yet caught up for most applications, researchers say. Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

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Evidence Indicates Cyclists May Age Better Than Those Who Don't Bike

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Harnessing the power of wearable devices, data, education and a peer support group, people with prediabetes can lose weight and fend off the disease. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

This Chef Lost 50 Pounds And Reversed Prediabetes With A Digital Program

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It's easy to mistake adolescent depression for something else, child psychiatrists say; the signs can include misbehavior, eating problems or sleep trouble. Johner Bildbyra/Getty Images hide caption

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Pediatricians Call For Universal Depression Screening For Teens

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Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV vaccination at Amistad Community Health Center in Corpus Christi, Texas, in 2016. Though gender differences in vaccine rates have narrowed, more girls than boys tend to get immunized against HPV. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don't Get It

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A Happy Meal and McFlurry are arranged for a photograph at a McDonald's Corp. fast food restaurant in Phoenix, Ariz. The company says in the next four years, 50 percent or more of its kids meals will meet new nutrition criteria, with 600 or fewer calories per meal and caps on calories from sugar and saturated fat. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Rebecka Ortiz offers her daughter a pasta sample at the store where she was using her food stamps to stock up on food for her family in Woonsocket, R.I. The Trump administration is proposing drastic changes in the "food stamp" program, now called SNAP. People getting that aid would lose much of their ability to choose the food they buy. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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A Family Finds A Way To Wean Themselves From Electronic Devices

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Smartphone Detox: How To Power Down In A Wired World

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Eating Leafy Greens Each Day Tied to Sharper Memory, Slower Decline

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The body's under a lot of stress during a bout of flu, doctors say. Inflammation is up and oxygen levels and blood pressure can drop. These changes can lead to an increased risk of forming blood clots in the vessels that serve the heart. laflor/Getty Images hide caption

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Flu Virus Can Trigger A Heart Attack

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Personalized Diets: Can Your Genes Really Tell You What To Eat?

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