Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is Food & Health correspondent for NPR News.
Allison Aubrey - 2015 square
Stories By

Allison Aubrey

Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is Food & Health correspondent for NPR News, currently focused on healthy aging. Her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's a contributor to CBS Sunday Morning and is a founding host of NPR's Life Kit. She's a 2021 recipient of the Recognizing Excellence in Advancing Health Literacy award.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Aubrey is a founding host of Life Kit and also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series. Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Monday

A large new study shows people who bike have less knee pain and arthritis than those who do not. PamelaJoeMcFarlane/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PamelaJoeMcFarlane/Getty Images

Like to bike? Your knees will thank you and you may live longer, too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1251561467/1252397446" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday

Mammograms should start at age 40, hormone therapy for menopause is safe, studies find

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1249231476/1249231477" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Low-dose estrogen can be taken orally, but it's also now available in patches, gels and creams. svetikd/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
svetikd/Getty Images

Hormones for menopause are safe, study finds. Here's what changed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1248525256/1248550836" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

The new guidelines were prompted by increased rates of breast cancer in women in their 40s. They recommend mammograms every other year, starting at age 40. izusek/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
izusek/Getty Images

Mammograms should start at age 40, new guidelines recommend

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1247941059/1248403530" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Climbing stairs is a good way to get quick bursts of aerobic exercise, says cardiologist Dr. Carlin Long. lingqi xie/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
lingqi xie/Getty Images

Elevator or stairs? Your choice could boost longevity, study finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1247532191/1247741725" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

Monday

Venca-Stastny/Getty Images

A cheap drug may slow down aging. A study will determine if it works

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1245872510/1246277665" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

After using the Lenire device for an hour each day for 12 weeks, Victoria Banks says her tinnitus is "barely noticeable." David Petrelli/Victoria Banks hide caption

toggle caption
David Petrelli/Victoria Banks

Got tinnitus? A device that tickles the tongue helps this musician find relief

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1244501055/1244762356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Study finds link between quality of sibling relationships and loneliness, depression

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243347224/1243347225" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

A a man pedals carrying a girl during a scheduled power outage in Bauta, Cuba, Monday, March 18. The island is facing an energy crisis, with waves of blackouts worsening in recent weeks. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ramon Espinosa/AP

Protests in Cuba; Results of the World Happiness Report

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1196979948/1239768958" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The U.S. ranks higher in the world happiness report when it comes to people aged 60 and older. Thomas Barwick/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Barwick/Getty Images

U.S. drops in new global happiness ranking. One age group bucks the trend

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239537074/1239609190" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Ultra-processed foods contain substances you wouldn't find in your own kitchen, like high-fructose corn syrup, artificial flavor and color enhancers, anti-caking agents and emulsifiers. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

From anxiety to cancer, the evidence against ultra-processed food piles up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1238939706/1239107326" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday

Women who do strength training live longer. How much is enough?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239036584/1239041419" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Monday

Strength training does more than build muscle. Its hidden benefits are massive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1237665808/1237665809" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Strength training is good for everyone, but women who train regularly get a significantly higher boost in longevity than men. Gary Yeowell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Yeowell/Getty Images

Women who do strength training live longer. How much is enough?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1236791784/1237398118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday

A plant-based diet is not just good for your health, it's good for the planet. Alexander Spatari/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Spatari/Getty Images

This diet swap can cut your carbon footprint and boost longevity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1234460368/1235731993" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Asthma drug can help reduce allergic reactions for those with severe food allergies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1233856105/1233856106" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday

This tuna, chickpea and parmesan salad bowl packs a protein punch, which is crucial for building muscle strength. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Aubrey/NPR

Millions of women are 'under-muscled.' These foods help build strength

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1231552773/1239188706" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Maria Fabrizio

You can order a test to find out your biological age. Is it worth it?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1228753141/1229117502" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

In this longevity lab, scientists are looking for ways to slow aging down

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1228462689/1228462690" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Maria Fabrizio/NPR

Scientists can tell how fast you're aging. Now, the trick is to slow it down

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1226911278/1227522356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

One common stumbling block to sticking with a New Year's resolution is setting an unrealistic goal. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Westend61/Getty Images

Don't let your resolutions wash away. Tips to turn a slow start into progress

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1223173854/1223424864" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

People who use hearing aids to restore hearing have a 24% lower risk of death, compared to people who don't use hearing aids, a new study finds. Pekic/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pekic/Getty Images

Hearing aids may boost longevity, study finds. But only if used regularly

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1222770525/1222952032" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript