Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

The FDA is updating the definition of 'healthy' and designing new labels

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Biden's summit aimed at tackling food insecurity and diet-related disease in the U.S.

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The White House is hosting a conference on nutrition and hunger

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Simply improving our breathing can significantly lower high blood pressure at any age. Recent research finds that just five to 10 minutes daily of exercises that strengthen the diaphragm and certain other muscles does the trick. SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR

Daily 'breath training' can work as well as medicine to reduce high blood pressure

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Insulin costs increased 600% over the last 20 years. States aim to curb the price

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Judge rules that companies are not required to provide coverage for HIV medication

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Gearing up for fall, health officials are recommending a new round of booster shots. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Omicron boosters: Do I need one, and if so, when?

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The U.S. food system makes junk food plentiful and cheap. Eating a diet based on whole foods like fresh fruit and vegetables can promote health - but can also strain a tight grocery budget. Food leaders are looking for ways to improve how Americans eat. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

Research shows that expanded access to preventive care and coverage has led to an increase in colon cancer screenings, vaccinations, use of contraception and chronic disease screenings. Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm

Efforts are underway to reduce the high costs of prescription drugs for U.S. patients

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Demonstrators outside PhRMA headquarters in Washington, D.C., protest lobbying by pharmaceutical companies to keep Medicare from negotiating lower prescription drug prices. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Blood pressure medication, among others, can complicate heat-related illness

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Reproductive rights groups want to make it easier to prevent pregnancy

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Drugmaker HRA Pharma has asked the Food and Drug Administration to approve an over-the-counter birth control pill called Opill. The agency's review process is estimated to take about 10 months. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

A company is seeking FDA approval for the 1st nonprescription birth control

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