Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.

Seeing double after toasting? Just wait for the hangover that's coming, thanks in part to those bubbles in sparkling wine. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

Want To Avoid A Hangover? Science Has Got You Covered

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Clockwise from top left: General Mills, Nestle, Dunkin Donuts, Panera, Tyson Chicken and McDonald's, among other big food companies, made commitments in 2015 to change the way they prepare and procure their food products. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty

The Year In Food: Artificial Out, Innovation In (And 2 More Trends)

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Drinking with co-workers can be festive — and fraught. In an informal survey of Salt readers, 25 percent of you told us you'd gotten tipsy enough to regret it at an office party, and 80 percent said you'd seen a co-worker overdo it, with embarrassing results. iStockphoto hide caption

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From Tipsy To Regret: Your Tales From The Office Holiday Party

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That black triangle icon is a sodium warning label next to a dish on the menu at an Applebee's in New York City. Starting Tuesday, the city's Health Department is requiring chain restaurants with 15 or more locations to display the salt shaker icon next to menu items containing 2,300 mg or more of sodium — the recommended daily limit. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

High-Sodium Warnings Hit New York City Menus

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Peponapis pruinosa is a species of bee in the tribe Eucerini, the long-horned bees. This bee relies on wild and cultivated squashes, pumpkins, gourds and related plants. Wikimedia/USDA hide caption

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Wikimedia/USDA

Thanksgiving Buzz: Pesticides Linked To Diminished Bee Health

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If you cook meat too long, at too high a temperature, the chemical reaction that creates tasty flavor and aroma compounds keeps going, creating other compounds. Some of those compounds can be carcinogenic when we consume them in high-enough concentrations. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

Turning Down The Heat When Cooking Meat May Reduce Cancer Risk

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People who drank three to five cups of coffee per day had a lower risk of premature death than those who didn't drink, a new study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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Drink To Your Health: Study Links Daily Coffee Habit To Longevity

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Study Looks To Provide Consensus On Yoga Poses And Pregnancy

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Four pregnant women sit in lotus position. Thomas Northcut/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Northcut/Getty Images

Say Yes To Down Dog: More Yoga Poses Are Safe During Pregnancy

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