Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
Allison Aubrey - 2015 square
Stories By

Allison Aubrey

Ariel Davis for NPR

Anger Can Be Contagious — Here's How To Stop The Spread

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/697052006/697616019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

To help protect the planet and promote good health, people should eat less than 1 ounce of red meat a day and limit poultry and milk, too. That's according to a new report from some of the top names in nutrition science. People should instead consume more nuts, fruits and vegetables, legumes, and whole grains, the report says. The strict recommended limits on meat are getting pushback. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

toggle caption
Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

Slow carbs like whole-grain breads and pastas, oats and brown rice are rich in fiber and take more time to digest, so they don't lead to the same quick rise in blood sugar that refined carbs can cause. fcafotodigital/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
fcafotodigital/Getty Images

You Don't Have To Go No-Carb: Instead, Think Slow Carb

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/686603016/687086010" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Left to right: The trainer demonstrates squats with a chair, pull-ups with a towel wrapped around a banister and jumping jack intervals. Jenna Sterner/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jenna Sterner/NPR

Get Fit — Faster: This 22-Minute Workout Has You Covered

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/684432540/685062345" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A customer holds a McDonald's Big Mac. The fast-food giant, one of the world's biggest beef buyers, has announced plans to use its might to cut back on antibiotics in its global beef supply. Environmentalists are applauding the commitment. Christoph Schmidt/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christoph Schmidt/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Getting physical activity every day can help maintain health throughout your life. Ronnie Kaufman/Larry Hirshowitz/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ronnie Kaufman/Larry Hirshowitz/Getty Images/Blend Images

New Physical Activity Guidelines Urge Americans: Move More, Sit Less

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666744493/667118413" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Physical Activity Guidelines To Change For The First Time In 10 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666870927/666870930" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Katherine Streeter for NPR

We Just 'Fell Back' An Hour. Here Are Tips To Stay Healthy During Dark Days Ahead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/663155917/664280784" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Food assistance recipients spend about 10 percent of their food budget on sugary drinks, while the rest of the population spends about 7 percent. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

When you get hearing aids, it can help you stay more stimulated and socially engaged. Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images

Want To Keep Your Brain Sharp? Take Care Of Your Eyes And Ears

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/658810909/659416513" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I am frustrated that despite all of our efforts, we haven't been able to identify the cause of this mystery illness," said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Images

CDC Investigates Cases Of Rare Neurological 'Mystery Illness' In Kids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657841031/658057284" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alex Schwartzman, a law student at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., is one of only 8 to 39 percent of college students who get the flu shot in a given year. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Mary Mathis/NPR

Think You Don't Need A Flu Shot? Here Are 5 Reasons To Change Your Mind

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/652140517/653232891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript