Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.

A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower. Albin Andersson/Nature hide caption

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Albin Andersson/Nature

Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

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Performance nutrition experts recommend stopping at all the hydration stations for a quick fill-up of a sports drink to replenish the glycogen that's being burned during a marathon. iStockphoto hide caption

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Paul Taylor/Getty Images

Tylenol Might Dull Emotional Pain, Too

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The salty suspects: Some 70 percent of the cheeses, soups, cold cuts and pizzas we buy at the grocery store exceed the Food and Drug Administration's "healthy" labeling standards for salt. Since we eat so much bread, it is — perhaps surprisingly — the top contributor of sodium to our diets. iStockphoto; Deborah Austin/Flickr; Beckman's Bakery/Flickr; iStockphoto; The Pizza Review/Flickr hide caption

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iStockphoto; Deborah Austin/Flickr; Beckman's Bakery/Flickr; iStockphoto; The Pizza Review/Flickr

GNC Announces New Policy After Facing Scrutiny Over Mislabeled Products

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"There's no reason to believe that exposure to arsenic in food and wine is above levels that are considered to be safe," says Susan Ebeler, a professor and chemist in the Foods For Health Institute at the University of California, Davis. Erik Schelzig/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Erik Schelzig/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Rethinking Alcohol: Can Heavy Drinkers Learn To Cut Back?

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How The First Bite Of Food Sets The Body's Clock

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Celebrity chef Giada De Laurentiis during a guest appearance on ABC's The Chew last fall. She can cook rich foods and keep her trim figure, but new research suggests that's a difficult feat for amateur cooks watching along at home. Lou Rocco/ABC/Getty Images hide caption

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Lou Rocco/ABC/Getty Images

Do TV Cooking Shows Make Us Fat?

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Circadian Surprise: How Our Body Clocks Help Shape Our Waistlines

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A "ballet" of Brussels sprouts dazzles at the Food Porn Index, a site that tracks which foods are trending in social media part of an effort to heighten the appeal of healthy eating. via Bolthouse Farms hide caption

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via Bolthouse Farms