Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.

Currently, half of all products served in the school lunch program must be "whole-grain rich," which USDA defines as products made of at least 50 percent whole grain. According to the new standards, by the start of the next school year, schools must use only products that are whole-grain rich. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

At 820 calories, Maggiano's tiramisu packs in more than the tiramisu served at Olive Garden (510 calories) or Macaroni Grill (690 calories). But it pales in comparison with the version served at Carrabba's, which has 1,060 calories. Maggiano's hide caption

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Maggiano's

The most healthful loaves of bread contain chunks of grain still intact, like the seeded loaf on the right. Whole wheat loaves, like the one in the middle, may contain few whole grains and may be made up mostly of refined flour, like the white bread on the left. Meg Vogel/NPR hide caption

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Meg Vogel/NPR

Where's The Whole Grain In Most Of Our Wheat Bread?

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Consuming anywhere from about 2,600 milligrams up to almost 5,000 milligrams of sodium per day is associated with more favorable health outcomes, according to a study. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Why All Fat Is Not Created Equal

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Nutrition researchers are reaching a new consensus: Cut back on all those refined carbs. And remember that some fat is good. Stacy Spensley/Flickr hide caption

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Stacy Spensley/Flickr

Rethinking Fat: The Case For Adding Some Into Your Diet

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The 1990s were rife with low-fat packaged snacks, from potato chips to cookies. Youtube and RetroJunk hide caption

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Youtube and RetroJunk

Why We Got Fatter During The Fat-Free Food Boom

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Eating some foods high in saturated fat is not necessarily going to increase your risk of heart disease, a study shows, contrary to the dietary science of the past 40 years. Cristian Baitg Schreiweis/iStockphoto hide caption

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Cristian Baitg Schreiweis/iStockphoto

Bolthouse Farms helped pave the way for using Mountain Dew-style tactics to sell healthy foods, like this ad for baby carrots. It was a wake-up call for the rest of the food industry. Crispin Porter Bogusky via AP hide caption

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Crispin Porter Bogusky via AP

Going, going, gone. You won't find azodicarbonamide in Nature's Own products. And Subway is phasing it out, too. But lots of manufacturers are still using the additive. Meg Vogel/NPR hide caption

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Meg Vogel/NPR

Almost 500 Foods Contain The 'Yoga Mat' Compound. Should We Care?

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