Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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No More Hidden Sugar: FDA Proposes New Label Rule

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A daily habit of sugary-sweetened drinks can boost your risk of developing the disease — even if you're not overweight. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Even If You're Lean, 1 Soda Per Day Ups Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

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Everything Bagel: This yogurt from Sohha Savory Yogurt comes topped with roasted pine nuts, poppy seeds, sesame seeds, garlic, onion and extra virgin olive oil. Christina Holmes/Courtesy of Sohha Savory Yogurt hide caption

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Christina Holmes/Courtesy of Sohha Savory Yogurt

Sugar Hooked Us On Yogurt. Could Savory Be The New Sweet?

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Scientists have documented that beneficial microorganisms play a critical role in how our bodies function. And it's becoming clear that the influence goes beyond the gut — researchers are turning their attention to our emotional health. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Prozac In The Yogurt Aisle: Can 'Good' Bacteria Chill Us Out?

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For 15 years, Jared Fogle has been the famous face of Subway. Here, Fogle (left) visits a Subway shop in Daytona Beach, Fla., with NASCAR driver Carl Edwards in 2012. Brian Blanco/AP hide caption

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Brian Blanco/AP

Can Subway Freshen Up Its Image After Jared?

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A quartet of tea-infused treats. Clockwise from left: Pastry chef's Naomi Gallego's old-fashioned doughnuts, flavored with Earl Grey; chocolate custard infused with jasmine tea, topped with a whipped cream ganache with a bit of lemon; berry scones with a hint of black berry tea; and blue French-style macarons made with lapsang souchong. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Bite into that bread before your main meal, and you'll spike your blood sugar and amp up your appetite. Waiting until the end of your dinner to nosh on bread can blunt those effects. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Curb Your Appetite: Save Bread For The End Of The Meal

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Eating eggs with your salad helps boost absorption of carotenoids — the pigments in tomatoes and carrots. Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

There's a growing body of evidence suggesting that compounds found in cocoa beans, called polyphenols, may help protect against heart disease. Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images

Chocolate, Chocolate, It's Good For Your Heart, Study Finds

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Imperfect Produce is a new venture that's sourcing funny-looking produce and partnering with the chain Raley's to sell it at discounted prices. Courtesy of Imperfect Produce hide caption

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Courtesy of Imperfect Produce

Microwave popcorn containing trans fats from November 2013. The Grocery Manufacturers Association says the industry has lowered the amount of trans fat added to food products by more than 86 percent. But trans fats can still be found in some processed food items. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters/Landov

FDA To Food Companies: This Time, Zero Means Zero Trans Fats

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Cesar Zuniga, operations manager at the Salinas Valley municipal dump in California, points to salad greens that still have two weeks before their sell-by date. "Some loads ... look very fresh," Zuniga says. "We question, wow, why is this being tossed?" Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Landfill Of Lettuce: Why Were These Greens Tossed Before Their Time?

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Even golfers using a motorized cart can burn about 1,300 calories and walk 2 miles when playing 18 holes. Halfdark/fstop/Corbis hide caption

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Halfdark/fstop/Corbis

Take A Swing At This: Golf Is Exercise, Cart Or No Cart

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