Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.

Care To Offset All Your Office Sitting? It'll Take Just An Hour A Day

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487814973/487814974" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Woohoo! Get wild, all ye Starbucks employees. Now crew necks are acceptable work wear! Starbucks hide caption

toggle caption
Starbucks

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487365625/487522882" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A 12-ounce bottle of Stella Artois contains 150 calories whereas a bottle of Budweiser Select, only 120. davidgsteadman/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
davidgsteadman/Flickr

Beer Bottles Will Soon Include A Reality Check: A Calorie Count

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486758216/486933710" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Surplus corn is piled outside a storage silo in Paoli, Colo. Do federal farm subsidies encourage the production — and perhaps overconsumption — of things that we're told to eat less of, like high fructose corn syrup or meat produced from livestock raised on subsidized grains? Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

A new study finds people who are well-hydrated have lower body weights and lower odds of obesity. Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

Thirsty? New Study Links Good Hydration To Slimmer Waistlines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485737511/485740643" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Caesar salad kit. Americans buy twice as many packages of bagged salad greens as heads of lettuce these days. Is the bagged stuff just as good? If it gets you to eat more leafy greens, yes. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Morgan McCloy/NPR

As Bagged Salad Kits Boom, Americans Eat More Greens

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485098252/485661762" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The new brewery at Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. The school now teaches the art and science of brewing, an elective course. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Aubrey/NPR

Fermentation Fervor: Here's How Chefs Boost Flavor And Health

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483228632/483337095" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Coffee gets the all-clear from the World Health Organization's cancer research agency. Rob MacEwen/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Rob MacEwen/Flickr

Java Lovers, Rejoice: Coffee Doesn't Pose A Cancer Risk, WHO Panel Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481635239/482521433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Opponents of a proposed sugary drink tax demonstrate outside City Hall in Philadelphia on June 8. The Philadelphia City Council is set to consider a sugary drink tax that Mayor Jim Kenney wants to pay for universal prekindergarten, community schools and park improvements. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Rourke/AP

Can The Soda Industry's $4 Million Ad Blitz Fend Off A Sugary Drink Tax?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482070736/482123584" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Beyonce inked a $50 million endorsement deal with Pepsi in 2012. Walter McBride/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Walter McBride/Corbis via Getty Images

This Is How Much Celebrities Get Paid To Endorse Soda And Unhealthy Food

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481123646/481235809" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript