Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

A kids healthy snacks display at Giant Eagle. Courtesy of Giant Eagle hide caption

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Courtesy of Giant Eagle

Grocers Lead Kids To Produce Aisle With Junk Food-Style Marketing

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Whisked bakery founder Jenna Huntsberger (right) and baker's assistant Lauren Moore prepare pies in Union Kitchen, a food incubator in Washington, D.C. Huntsberger says the shared kitchen space and the business know-how she's honed there have played a big part in her success. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For Food Startups, Incubators Help Dish Up Success

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Varying speed while walking may make the activity much more effective. iStockphoto hide caption

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Interval Training While Walking Helps Control Blood Sugar

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An FDA rule effective Aug. 5 states that foods may be labeled "gluten free" only if there's less than 20 parts per million of the protein. James Benet/iStockphoto hide caption

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James Benet/iStockphoto

Truth In Labeling: Celiac Community Cheers FDA Rule For Gluten Free

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Cody Vasquez, 11, is from Arizona. His winning dish was shrimp tacos with watermelon jicama salad. Jeff Elkins for Epicurious hide caption

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Jeff Elkins for Epicurious

Listen to Kiana Farkash

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A nutrient-dense diet may help tamp down stress. And these foods may help boost our moods (clockwise from left): pumpkin seeds, sardines, eggs, salmon, flax seeds, Swiss chard and dark chocolate. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Food-Mood Connection: How You Eat Can Amp Up Or Tamp Down Stress

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You can find wood pulp in several brands of packaged shredded cheese. It helps keep the cheese from clumping. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard/NPR

From McDonald's To Organic Valley, You're Probably Eating Wood Pulp

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Researchers say the polyphenols in dark chocolate can help the body form more nitric oxide, a compound that causes blood vessels to dilate and blood to flow more easily. iStockphoto hide caption

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Rugby and meat: a treat for the gut? A study suggests yes. Here Tony Woodcock (left) and Owen Franks of the All Blacks rugby team turn sausages on the barbecue in 2011 in Christchurch, New Zealand. Phil Walter/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Walter/Getty Images
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School Lunch Debate: What's At Stake?

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