Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.

Haystack Mountain Goat Dairy, a Colorado goat cheese producer, says it will begin to source more milk from dairies that don't rely on inmate labor — so that they can continue to sell some cheeses to Whole Foods. ilovebutter/Flickr hide caption

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ilovebutter/Flickr

The large British study, begun in 1958, tracked the diet, habits and emotional and physical health of thousands of people from childhood through midlife. iStockphoto hide caption

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Childhood Stress May Prime Pump For Chronic Disease Later

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Longer lines in the cafeteria and shorter lunch periods mean many public school students get just 15 minutes to eat. Yet researchers say when kids get less than 20 minutes for lunch, they eat less of everything on their tray. iStockphoto hide caption

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Most fruits and vegetables — particularly after being cut — store better in an airtight container, Gunders says. And it's best to store them in see-through containers so we don't forget about them. USDA hide caption

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USDA

Despite all the efforts to get kids to eat more healthfully, the rate of fast-food consumption hasn't budged in the past 15 years, the CDC finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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About A Third Of U.S. Kids And Teens Ate Fast Food Today

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The government's first ever national target to reduce food waste will encourage farmers to donate more of their imperfect produce to the hungry. iStockphoto hide caption

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It's Time To Get Serious About Reducing Food Waste, Feds Say

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The group of women in a new study with the lowest rate of breast cancer consumed about four tablespoons of olive oil each day. Heather Rousseau/NPR hide caption

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Heather Rousseau/NPR

Mediterranean Diet With Extra Olive Oil May Lower Breast Cancer Risk

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A school lunch tray featuring whole wheat tortillas at the School Nutrition Association conference in July 2014. The association is asking Congress to relax the federal school nutrition standards in hopes of attracting more kids back to the school lunch line. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Lunch Ladies Want Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act To Lighten Up

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Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers in Miami, Fla., on April 27, 2015, the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

People who don't get enough sleep show higher levels of inflammation, say scientists who study colds. Smoking, chronic stress and lack of exercise can make you more susceptible to the viruses, too. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Corbis hide caption

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Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Corbis

Sleep More, Sneeze Less: Increased Slumber Helps Prevent Colds

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Eat fish or take a fish oil supplement? Research suggests eating fish regularly over a lifetime is good for the brain. But when it comes to staving off cognitive decline in seniors, fish oil supplements just don't cut it, a study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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If Fish Is Brain Food, Can Fish Oil Pills Boost Brains, Too?

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The McDonald's inside the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, in 2004. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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Tony Dejak/AP

So Long, Big Mac: Cleveland Clinic Ousts McDonald's From Cafeteria

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Communal meals are woven into our DNA. But eating alone is no longer a social taboo. iStockphoto hide caption

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Party Of 1: We Are Eating A Lot Of Meals Alone

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