Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour and is one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Restaurant food and packaged foods are often high in salt to make them more palatable. The Food and Drug Administration wants to see the food industry gradually reduce sodium levels in these foods. Eric Savage/Getty Images hide caption

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Eating too much salt is making Americans sick. Even a 12% reduction can save lives

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The FDA authorizes e-cigarettes for the first time, citing benefits for smokers

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FDA gives its 1st authorization for e-cigarettes

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It is expected to be a big week regarding vaccination booster news

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What we know about COVID-19 vaccines for children and long haul COVID

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Latest Data On COVID-19 Infections Show Cases Are Dropping

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CDC Advisers Deliberate Over The Need For A Pfizer COVID Vaccine Booster

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A Pfizer Booster Is Authorized For People 65+ Or At High-Risk For COVID

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COVID-19 Vaccine Is Safe And Effective For Kids Ages 5-11, Pfizer Says

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As COVID-19 Cases Rise, Biden's Original Booster Strategy Has Slowed

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A firefighter walks through the rubble in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks. Shawn Baldwin/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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9/11 First Responders Have Higher Cancer Risks But Better Survival Rates

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The FDA Will Take More Time To Determine If Benefits Of Juul Products Outweigh Harm

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The FDA Considers The Benefit Of Vaping For Adults, Over The Risk Of Teen Addiction

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Twenty years after 9/11, the first responders who rushed in to save lives at the World Trade Center suffer higher rates of cancer than the general public. And many have died of cancers linked to the exposure to toxins in the air. But research suggests they're surviving at higher rates too. Gary Hershorn/Getty Images hide caption

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9/11 First Responders Face A High Cancer Risk But Are Also More Likely To Survive

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