Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour and is one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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A girl in a park in Beijing on Feb. 15. Researchers are looking at the impact of the newly identified coronavirus on children. Wang Zhao /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao /AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Is Contagious, But Kids Seem Less Vulnerable So Far

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Disposable vapes may be hotter than Juul among kids, according to researcher Bonnie Halpern-Felsher. She received a bag of vape pens recently confiscated by a high school principal in northern California, with flavors like Banana Ice and Cool Mint. Bonnie Halpern-Felsher hide caption

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Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

Parents: Teens Are Still Vaping, Despite Flavor Ban. Here's What They're Using

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The city of Wuhan, epicenter of the current coronavirus outbreak. Jia Yu/Getty Images hide caption

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Jia Yu/Getty Images

Can Coronavirus Be Crushed By Warmer Weather?

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Your body needs trace amounts of zinc for cell division and other basic biology. Nobody's sure how it works to shorten colds. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

Poll: 61% Of Americans Approve Of U.S. Government's Coronavirus Response

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"It's not going to be transported on a box," Dr. Michael Ison, an infectious disease specialist at Northwestern University, says of your chances of contracting the novel coronavirus from packages shipped from China. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

No, You Won't Catch The New Coronavirus Via Packages Or Mail From China

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On Friday, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar declared the novel coronavirus a public health emergency in the United States. From left, in Washington D.C., are Deputy Secretary of State Stephen Biegun, Acting Transportation Undersecretary Joel Szabat, Azar, and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony Fauci. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Making sure to frequently give your hands a thorough scrub — with soap and for about as long as it takes to sing the "Happy Birthday" song a couple of times — can significantly cut your chances of catching the flu or other respiratory virus. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Worried About Catching The New Coronavirus? In The U.S., Flu Is A Bigger Threat

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Villagers just outside the city of Nanchang, Jiangxi, erected their own blockade with a sign that says, "Outside people and cars forbidden from entering." Residents say hundreds of migrant workers returned from Wuhan for the Lunar New Year holiday and are now not allowed to leave. Amy Cheng/NPR hide caption

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Amy Cheng/NPR

Amid Coronavirus Scare, U.S. Counts Thousands Of Flu Deaths

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This chicken from Memphis Meats was produced with cells taken from an animal and grown into meat in a "cultivator." The process is analogous to how yeast is grown in breweries to produce beer. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR