Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour and is one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

While the omicron variant steals the spotlight, delta is still a big problem

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The Biden administration announces steps to slow COVID in the winter months

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Health officials encourage vaccinations as U.S. waits for arrival of omicron

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White House prepares for the chance COVID vaccines won't protect against Omicron

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Passengers check in at the Lufthansa counter at Johannesburg's OR Tambo airport, Monday Nov. 29, 2021. The World Health Organization urged countries around the world not to impose flight bans on southern African nations due to concern over the new omicron variant. Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

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Omicron's Arrival Is 'Wake-Up Call' That The Pandemic Is Ongoing

The coronavirus is still circulating and mutating — case in point, the World Health Organization has designated a new variant of concern, called omicron. The variant appears to have some characteristics that may make it more transmissible than others, but much about it is still unknown. NPR health correspondent Allison Aubrey talks with Emily Kwong about how researchers and public health experts are racing to learn all they can about it — including how transmissible it actually is and how it responds to current vaccines. They also talk travel bans, a weak tool in preventing viral spread that may even penalize information sharing.

Omicron's Arrival Is 'Wake-Up Call' That The Pandemic Is Ongoing

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The omicron variant is the latest proof that the pandemic isn't over

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A recent survey says about half of Americans are planning to attend gatherings of 10 or more people over the holidays. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Celebrate The Holidays Safely This Pandemic

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Yes, COVID-19 Cases Are Up. No, It's Not A Repeat Of Last Year.

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How to celebrate Thanksgiving safely — while still in the grips of the pandemic

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CDC Directory Walensky endorses boosters for everyone over age 18

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Colin Sweeney, 12, got a shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine as his mother, Nicole, stands by in Pasadena, Calif., in May. As of this week, kids aged 5 to 11 can also get vaccinated against COVID-19. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Some parents want to wait to vaccinate their kids. Here's why doctors say do it now

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Will the CDC follow the FDA and approve Pfizer's vaccine for kids ages 5-11?

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An advisory panel to the FDA recommends Pfizer's vaccine for kids ages 5 to 11

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