Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a Washington-based correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She has reported extensively on the coronavirus pandemic since it began, providing near-daily coverage of new developments and effects. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour and is one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Sunday

Eye-popping egg prices have finally started to fall. Wholesale eggs in the Midwest market dropped by 58 cents to $3.29 a dozen at the end of January, according to USDA data. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Eggs prices drop, but the threat from avian flu isn't over yet

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Wednesday

FDA announces a restructuring of the agency's food safety and nutrition division

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Monday

Wegovy has been called "a major breakthrough" given how well it works to reduce body weight. But the injection drug is extremely expensive and when people can't afford to stay on it, they experience rebound weight gain that's hard to stop. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Wegovy works. But here's what happens if you can't afford to keep taking the drug

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Wednesday

New guidance calls for lower lead levels in food for babies and children under 2. Lead exposure can be harmful to developing brains. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty

The FDA proposes new targets to limit lead in baby food

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Monday

Can simple brain quizzes predict who gets a virus?

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Thursday

Walking five minutes every half-hour can reduce the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. EschCollection/Getty Images hide caption

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EschCollection/Getty Images

Sitting all day can be deadly. 5-minute walks can offset harms

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Monday

Doctors say bystanders can do a lot to help someone who has stopped breathing

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Friday

Doctors say Damar Hamlin's neurological condition and function are intact

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Monday

Rose Wong for NPR

Time is fleeting. Here's how to stay on track with New Year's goals

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Monday

Doctors warn that heart attacks spike this time of year

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Monday

Doctors normally prescribe medicine and now some are prescribing meals

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Tuesday

Cultivated Meat is an alternative to traditional meat derived from cells in a lab. In this photo, a chicken breast is prepared at Upside Foods. Brian L. Frank for NPR/Brian L. Frank for NPR hide caption

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Brian L. Frank for NPR/Brian L. Frank for NPR

A Taste Of Lab-Grown Meat

The idea came to Uma Valeti while he was working on regrowing human tissue to help heart attack patients: If we can grow tissue from cells in a lab, why not use animal cells to grow meat?

A Taste Of Lab-Grown Meat

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Thursday

A new kind of meat grown from animal cells is on the menu at COP27

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Monday

Chicken made from animal cells is made into a dish at Upside Foods. Brian L. Frank for NPR hide caption

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Brian L. Frank for NPR

FDA gives safety nod to 'no kill' meat, bringing it closer to sale in the U.S.

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Sunday

Millions of Americans are prescribed statins to reduce the risk of heart disease, but many prefer to take supplements like fish oil, garlic and flaxseed. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Statins vs. supplements: New study finds one is 'vastly superior' to cut cholesterol

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