Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour and is one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Momentum Grows Across The Country For Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccinations

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Students wearing masks listen to teacher Dorene Scala during third grade summer school at Hooper Avenue School in Los Angeles, California. Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Subway riders mask up this month in New York City. Wearing masks in all kinds of indoor settings may be the safest way to slow the spread of the delta variant, many health experts say. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

CDC Urges Vaccinated People To Mask Up Indoors In Places With High Virus Transmission

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Dr. Fauci Warns That COVID-19 Cases Are Headed In The Wrong Direction

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Time For Caution Amid COVID-19 Surge And Breakthrough Cases

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Covid-19 infections in New York City are climbing for the first time in months as the delta variant gains traction and vaccination rates in some boroughs remain stubbornly low. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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The Delta Variant And The Latest Coronavirus Surge

COVID-19 cases are on the rise in the last month due to the Delta variant. NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey talks with Emily Kwong about where the virus is resurging, how some public health officials are reacting and what they are recommending. Also, with a spate of outbreaks at summer camp, officials are weighing in on what parents can do before they send children to camp.

The Delta Variant And The Latest Coronavirus Surge

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The Delta Variant Raises A Lot Of Question About The Latest COVID Surge

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People enjoy an outdoor art exhibition in downtown Los Angeles in early July. Los Angeles County public health authorities are now urging unvaccinated and vaccinated people alike to wear face coverings in public indoor spaces because of the growing threat posed by the more contagious delta variant of the coronavirus. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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97% Of People Entering Hospitals For COVID-19 Are Unvaccinated

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A COVID-19 vaccination clinic last month in Auburn, Maine. A drop in life expectancy in the U.S. stems largely from the coronavirus pandemic, a new study says. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

The Pandemic Led To The Biggest Drop In U.S. Life Expectancy Since WWII, Study Finds

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U.S. President Joe Biden (left) speaks as Vice President Kamala Harris (right) listens during an event in the South Court Auditorium of the White House. President Biden spoke on the COVID-19 response and the vaccination program announcing new incentives including free beer, free childcare and free sports tickets to push Americans to get vaccinated before July 4th. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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COVID-19 Vaccines, Boosters And The Renaissance In Vaccine Technology

Health Correspondent Allison Aubrey updates us on the Biden Administration's goal to have 70 percent of U.S. adults vaccinated by the July 4. Plus, as vaccine makers plan for the possibility that COVID-19 vaccine boosters will be needed, they're pushing ahead with research into new-generation flu shots and mRNA cancer vaccines.

COVID-19 Vaccines, Boosters And The Renaissance In Vaccine Technology

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Success Of COVID-19 Vaccines Ushers In Renaissance In Vaccine Technology

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