Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is Food & Health correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is Food & Health correspondent for NPR News, currently focused on healthy aging. Her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's a contributor to CBS Sunday Morning and is a founding host of NPR's Life Kit. She's a 2021 recipient of the Recognizing Excellence in Advancing Health Literacy award.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Sunday

This tuna, chickpea and parmesan salad bowl packs a protein punch, which is crucial for building muscle strength. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Millions of women are 'under-muscled.' These foods help build strength

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Monday

Maria Fabrizio

You can order a test to find out your biological age. Is it worth it?

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Thursday

In this longevity lab, scientists are looking for ways to slow aging down

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Monday

Maria Fabrizio/NPR

Scientists can tell how fast you're aging. Now, the trick is to slow it down

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Monday

One common stumbling block to sticking with a New Year's resolution is setting an unrealistic goal. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Don't let your resolutions wash away. Tips to turn a slow start into progress

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Thursday

People who use hearing aids to restore hearing have a 24% lower risk of death, compared to people who don't use hearing aids, a new study finds. Pekic/Getty Images hide caption

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Hearing aids may boost longevity, study finds. But only if used regularly

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Monday

Inspired by 'blue zones': 7 daily habits to live a longer, healthier life

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Tuesday

Acts of generosity — like giving gifts — brings happiness, research shows

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Monday

Studies show when people are given something they are more likely to give back. ArtistGNDphotography/Gettyimages hide caption

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Giving gifts boosts happiness, research shows. So why do we feel frazzled?

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Wednesday

Only about 1/3 of people who'd benefit from statin medications are taking them

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Only one-third of people eligible to take life-saving statins are doing so

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Sunday

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Feeling alone? 5 tips to create connection and combat loneliness

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Tuesday

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Can little actions bring big joy? Researchers find 'micro-acts' can boost well-being

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Monday

People who consistently wear hearing aids have a lower chance of falling, a new study finds. picture alliance/dpa/picture alliance via Getty I hide caption

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picture alliance/dpa/picture alliance via Getty I

Hearing loss can lead to deadly falls, but hearing aids may cut the risk

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Monday

Adding brain games during tai chi can help keep the mind sharp

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People who practice cognitively enhanced tai chi significantly improved their scores on memory tests. PYMCA/Avalon via Getty Images hide caption

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Tai chi helps boost memory, study finds. One type seems most beneficial

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Tuesday

Globally, women are cooking twice as many meals as men

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Monday

Worldwide, women cook nearly nine meals a week on average, while men cook only four, according to a new survey. Penpak Ngamsathain/Getty Images hide caption

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Worldwide, women cook twice as much as men: One country bucks the trend

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Tuesday

AI could help detect irregular heart rhythms in EKGs that humans can't see

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Monday

With the help of AI, cardiologists can predict who will develop A-Fib

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Saturday

There's renewed pressure on the FDA to ban synthetic food dye Red No. 3

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Thursday

People who consume higher amounts of red meat and processed meat are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than people who consume less, a new study finds. LauriPatterson/Getty Images hide caption

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Too much red meat is linked to a 50% increase in Type 2 diabetes risk

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Tuesday

Monday

There's renewed pressure on the FDA to ban synthetic food dye Red No. 3

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