Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour.

Aubrey is a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. Along with her colleagues on The Salt, Aubrey is winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. She was also a nominee for a James Beard Award in 2013 for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was also a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

Kristen Uroda for NPR

Tylenol May Help Ease The Pain Of Hurt Feelings

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A new report reveals how the industry influenced research in the 1960s to deflect concerns about the impact of sugar on health — including pulling the plug on a study it funded. Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images

What The Industry Knew About Sugar's Health Effects, But Didn't Tell Us

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Lots of families fight over politics at the holiday table. But decisions about which foods to put on the table can whip up stress and squabbles, too. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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It's Not Just Politics. Food Can Stir Holiday Conflict, Too

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Is There A Way To Keep Using Opioid Painkillers And Reduce Risk?

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A menu board shows calorie counts hangs at a Starbucks in New York City. The FDA had previously halted the roll out of rules requiring chain restaurants and other food establishments to post calories on menus. Now, the agency says the rules will be in place by May 2018. Candice Choi/AP hide caption

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Candice Choi/AP

Amid Privacy Concerns, Mattel Shelved Planned Device For Kids

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Alexa, Are You Safe For My Kids?

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An overdose rescue kit handed out at an overdose prevention class this summer in New York City includes an injectable form of the drug naloxone. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Counting The Heavy Cost Of Care In The Age Of Opioids

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The foods on the left contain naturally occurring fibers that are intrinsic in plants. The foods on the right contain isolated fibers, such as chicory root, which are extracted and added to processed foods. The FDA will determine whether added fibers can count as dietary fiber on nutrition facts labels. Carolyn Rogers/NPR hide caption

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Carolyn Rogers/NPR

The FDA Will Decide Whether 26 Ingredients Count As Fiber

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She's not tuning in, she's tuning inward — letting go of stress, or at least trying to, with a mindfulness app on her phone. Photo Illustration by Carolyn Rogers/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Carolyn Rogers/NPR

Mindfulness Apps Aim To Help People Disconnect From Stress

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Chicago-Area Residents No Longer Have To Pay More For Pop

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How Messing With Our Biological Clock Impacts Well-Being

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In 2011, the Food and Drug Administration sent an advisory about an outbreak of listeria linked to cantaloupes killed 33 people. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

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Gosia Wozniacka/AP

FDA Not Doing Enough To Fix Serious Food Safety Violations, Report Finds

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