Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour.

Aubrey is a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. Along with her colleagues on The Salt, Aubrey is winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. She was also a nominee for a James Beard Award in 2013 for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was also a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

A small new study shows that successful dieters had an abundance of a bacteria called Phascolarctobacterium, whereas another bacteria, Dialister, was associated with a failure to lose weight. sorbetto/Getty Images hide caption

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Diet Hit A Snag? Your Gut Bacteria May Be Partly To Blame

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Unless you replenish fluids, just an hour's hike in the heat or a 30-minute run might be enough to get mildly dehydrated, scientists say. RunPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Off Your Mental Game? You Could Be Mildly Dehydrated

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Heat Making You Lethargic? Research Shows It Can Slow Your Brain, Too

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When ticks come into contact with clothing sprayed with permethrin, research shows, they quickly become incapacitated and are unable to bite. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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To Repel Ticks, Try Spraying Your Clothes With A Pesticide That Mimics Mums

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The latest study to link coffee and longevity adds to a growing body of evidence that, far from a vice, the brew can be protective of good health. Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Coffee Drinkers Are More Likely To Live Longer. Decaf May Do The Trick, Too

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If you are bitten by a Lone Star tick, you could develop an unusual allergy to red meat. And as this tick's territory spreads beyond the Southeast, the allergy seems to be spreading with it. Robert Noonan/Science Source hide caption

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Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

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A study finds light drinkers have the lowest combined risk of getting cancer and dying prematurely — lower than nondrinkers. Alcohol is estimated to be the third-largest contributor to overall cancer deaths. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Drinking Alcohol Can Raise Cancer Risk. How Much Is Too Much?

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The Controversy Over Maple Syrup

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Americans are increasingly taking multiple drugs. And depression is a potential side effect of many of them. Glasshouse Images/Getty Images hide caption

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1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To Depression

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The Perils Of Pushing Kids Too Hard, And How Parents Can Learn To Back Off

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A man shops for vegetables beside romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in Los Angeles. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hey, Salad Lovers: It's OK To Eat Romaine Lettuce Again

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Frozen vegetables are displayed for sale at an Aldi supermarket in Hackensack, N.J. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Frozen Food Fan? As Sales Rise, Studies Show Frozen Produce Is As Healthy As Fresh

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Pennsylvania's Supreme Court To Hear Arguments In Soda Tax Case

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Signs declare the calorie counts for sandwiches and other grab-and-go items at a Starbucks in Washington, D.C. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Now That Calorie Labels Are Federal Law, Will We Eat Less?

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