Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour and is one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Smog is common not only in Los Angeles but also in cities across the country. New research finds that long-term exposure to high levels of air pollution may be as harmful to the lungs as smoking. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Air Pollution May Be As Harmful To Your Lungs As Smoking Cigarettes, Study Finds

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People light candles during a prayer and candle vigil organized by the city, after the recent shooting at a WalMart in El Paso, Texas. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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From Pain To Purpose: 5 Ways To Cope In The Wake Of Trauma

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Large swaths of forest have been cut down in Brazil in recent decades to make room for farming. Deforestation contributes to global warming, and reversing it will be necessary to avoid catastrophic climate change. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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To Slow Global Warming, U.N. Warns Agriculture Must Change

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Allergan Recalls Textured Breast Implants Linked To Rare Type Of Cancer

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Mixing Alcohol And Sun? Beware, A Buzz Begets A Faster Burn

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Shines Spotlight On Acute Flaccid Myelitis

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How A Break From Alcohol Influences Health

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Chris Marshall has organized pop-up Sans Bars in New York, Washington, D.C., and Anchorage, Alaska. And he has expanded into permanent spaces in Kansas City, Mo., and western Massachusetts. Julia Robinson for NPR hide caption

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Julia Robinson for NPR

Breaking The Booze Habit, Even Briefly, Has Its Benefits

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Athletic Brewing Co. co-founders Bill Shufelt (right) and John Walker, here at the company's production plant in Stratford, Conn., have created a range of high-quality nonalcoholic beers to provide people more options when they're out socializing. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Processed meats, including hot dogs and bacon, cook in a frying pan. A new study of 80,000 people finds that those who ate the most red meat — especially processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs — had a higher risk of premature death compared with those who cut back. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada to prevent HIV infection in people at high risk. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Expert Panel Recommends Wider Use Of Daily Pill To Prevent HIV Infections

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A sign in the window of a New York City market advertises the acceptance of food stamps. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Fight Over Beef Jerky Reveals Tensions Over SNAP In The Trump Era

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What Counts As A Healthy 'Staple Food' Option For SNAP Benefits?

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