Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour and is one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

Another Sad Coronavirus Pandemic Milestone Is Approaching

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President Biden aims to have 70% of adults vaccinated with at least one shot by July 4. About a dozen states have reached that goal, but vaccination rates in some other states remain low. Yulia Reznikov/Getty Images hide caption

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Yulia Reznikov/Getty Images

COVID News Round-Up: Vaccination Progress, Booster Shots, Travel

Nationwide, almost 65% of adults have had at least one vaccine shot, but vaccination rates vary significantly depending on the state. NPR health correspondent Allison Aubrey gives us the latest on the country's vaccination progress: which states are on track (and which are not), new research about why it's important teenagers get vaccinated, and what we know about the possibility of booster shots.

COVID News Round-Up: Vaccination Progress, Booster Shots, Travel

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U.S. Moves Closer To Biden's July 4 COVID-19 Vaccination Goal

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As U.S. COVID-19 Cases Ease, Questions Remain About Lingering Effects

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Jacob Balogun, 12, of DC receives a COVID-19 vaccine. Children's National Hospital gave the vaccine to its first batch of 12-15 year old children on May 13. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Im

The State Of Vaccinations In The U.S.

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Transition: Some Pandemic Safety Precautions Lifted, Others Remain

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Jennifer Minhas had been a nurse for years when she contracted COVID-19 in 2020. Since then, lingering symptoms — what's known as long-haul COVID-19 — made it impossible for her to work. For months, she and her doctors struggled to understand what was behind her fatigue and rapid heartbeat, among other symptoms. Tara Pixley for NPR hide caption

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Tara Pixley for NPR

The employees at Presidente Supermarket in Miami, Florida — like the rest of America's grocery store workers — are on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, helping to keep the nation's residents fed. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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CDC Criticized For Confusing Updated Mask Recommendation

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A sign at Michigan State University directs people to a vaccination site. The university is one of an increasing number to require on-campus students to be vaccinated. Anna Nichols/AP hide caption

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Anna Nichols/AP

43% Of Adults Are Vaccinated Against COVID-19. Shot Coming For Kids

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A person skateboards along the Venice Beach boardwalk in Venice, California. The CDC issued new guidelines stating that fully vaccinated people do not need to wear masks outdoors, except in crowded locations. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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A Vaccination Update And The CDC's Latest Guidance On Masks

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AS U.S. COVID-19 Cases Drop, White House Urges Vaccinations

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CDC Issues New Recommendations On Face Coverings

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