Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour.

Aubrey is a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. Along with her colleagues on The Salt, Aubrey is winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. She was also a nominee for a James Beard Award in 2013 for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was also a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

Processed meats, including hot dogs and bacon, cook in a frying pan. A new study of 80,000 people finds that those who ate the most red meat — especially processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs — had a higher risk of premature death compared with those who cut back. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada to prevent HIV infection in people at high risk. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Expert Panel Recommends Wider Use Of Daily Pill To Prevent HIV Infections

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A sign in the window of a New York City market advertises the acceptance of food stamps. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Fight Over Beef Jerky Reveals Tensions Over SNAP In The Trump Era

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What Counts As A Healthy 'Staple Food' Option For SNAP Benefits?

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Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a compound that can be extracted from marijuana or from hemp. It doesn't get people high because it doesn't contain THC, the psychoactive component of the cannabis plant. Getty Images hide caption

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FDA Questions Safety And Marketing Of Cannabidiol, Known As CBD

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New research shows that daily light walking is important for maintaining health as you age. But if you can't hit 10,000 steps, don't worry. Peter Muller/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Peter Muller/Getty Images/Cultura RF

10,000 Steps A Day? How Many You Really Need To Boost Longevity

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Confusion over whether food is still safe to eat after its "sell by" or "use before" date accounts for about one-fifth of food waste in U.S. homes, the FDA says. The agency is urging the food industry to adopt "best if used by" wording on packaged foods. zoranm/Getty Images hide caption

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To Reduce Food Waste, FDA Urges 'Best If Used By' Date Labels

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Can CBD Reduce Cravings And Stress In Opioid Users?

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A new study finds that women who ate a low-fat diet and more fruits, vegetables and grains, lowered their risk of dying from breast cancer. But which of those factors provided the protective effect? Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF hide caption

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Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF

Researchers Say Evidence Shows What You Eat Really Does Matter

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We Gossip About 52 Minutes A Day. That May Not Be As Toxic As It Sounds

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From Gloom To Gratitude: 8 Skills To Cultivate Joy

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MMR — the modern combination vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella — provides stronger, longer-lasting protection against measles than the stand-alone measles vaccine typically given in the U.S. in the early 1960s. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Measles Shots Aren't Just For Kids: Many Adults Could Use A Booster Too

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