Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
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Allison Aubrey

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Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour and is one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Along with her NPR science desk colleagues, Aubrey is the winner of a 2019 Gracie Award. She is the recipient of a 2018 James Beard broadcast award for her coverage of 'Food As Medicine.' Aubrey is also a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. In 2013, Aubrey won a Gracie Award with her colleagues on The Salt, NPR's food vertical. They also won a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. In 2009-2010, she was a Kaiser Media Fellow.

Joining NPR in 2003 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk. She also hosted NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen video series.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour and a producer for C-SPAN's Presidential election coverage.

Aubrey received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Denison University in Granville, Ohio, and a Master of Arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Running and other moderate exercise can protect against lifestyle disease. A new study shows training for a marathon slows cardiovascular aging. RichVintage/Getty Images hide caption

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Ready For Your First Marathon? Training Can Cut Years Off Your Cardiovascular Age

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Overall, researchers found men died of alcohol-related causes in 2017 at a higher rate than women. But when analyzing annual increases in deaths, the largest increase was among white women. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Dry January: The Health Benefits From Taking A Break From Alcohol

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Trump Administration Issues Partial And Temporary E-Cigarette Ban

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6 Ways To Take A Break From Drinking

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Bryant Johnson puts Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg through her paces for a living. Johnson's got a workout for the rest of us, too. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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This 22-Minute Workout Has Everything You Need

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Using e-cigarettes doesn't seem to be as risky as smoking tobacco. But both activities can cause long-term lung problems, research finds — and the effect seems to be additive for people who do both. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Vaping Nicotine Linked To Increased Risk Of Chronic Lung Disease

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New Study Offers First Evidence Of Vaping's Long-Term Risks

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Teens With ADHD More Likely To Get Hooked On Nicotine, Research Shows

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Lindsey Balbierz for NPR

A new study finds that time-restricted eating helped overweight people who were at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes lose about 3% of their body weight, reduce belly fat and feel more energetic. erhui1979/Getty Images hide caption

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Eat For 10 Hours. Fast For 14. This Daily Habit Prompts Weight Loss, Study Finds

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Peter Melnik, a fourth-generation dairy farmer, owns Bar-Way Farm, Inc. in Deerfield, Mass. He has an anaerobic digester on his farm that converts food waste into renewable energy. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Chew On This: Farmers Are Using Food Waste To Make Electricity

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