Karen Grigsby Bates Karen Grigsby Bates is an NPR senior correspondent.
Karen Grigsby Bates
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Karen Grigsby Bates

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Nina Gregory/NPR

Karen Grigsby Bates

Senior Correspondent

Karen Grigsby Bates is the Senior Correspondent for Code Switch, a podcast that reports on race and ethnicity. A veteran NPR reporter, Bates covered race for the network for several years before becoming a founding member of the Code Switch team. She is especially interested in stories about the hidden history of race in America—and in the intersection of race and culture. She oversees much of Code Switch's coverage of books by and about people of color, as well as issues of race in the publishing industry. Bates is the co-author of a best-selling etiquette book (Basic Black: Home Training for Modern Times) and two mystery novels; she is also a contributor to several anthologies of essays. She lives in Los Angeles and reports from NPR West.

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How Long Will Fashion's Racial Reckoning Be In Style?

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Code Switch interviews senior critic-at-large Robin Givhan about the uptick in magazine covers featuring black women this September. NPR hide caption

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What's In A Name? The History Of Karens, Beckys And Miss Anns

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The evolution of a nickname for a certain type of white woman. Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR hide caption

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Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR

Code Switch: What's In A 'Karen'?

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The evolution of a nickname for a certain type of white woman. Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR hide caption

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Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR

Similarities And Differences Of George Floyd Protests And The Civil Rights Movement

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LEFT: Leaders of a march of about 255 people stare at police officers who stopped the group from marching on city hall in Pritchard, Ala, on June 12, 1968. RIGHT: A protester shows a picture of George Floyd from her phone to a wall of security guards near the White House on June 3, 2020, in Washington, DC. Bettman / Jim Watson/Getty hide caption

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Bettman / Jim Watson/Getty

André Leon Talley Writes About Wintour, Lagerfeld In 'Chiffon Trenches'

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