Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Jason Beaubien

Mike Morgan/NPR
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of issues across the world. He's covered the plight of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, mass cataract surgeries in Ethiopia, abortion in El Salvador, poisonous gold mines in Nigeria, drug-resistant malaria in Myanmar and tuberculosis in Tajikistan. He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. His current beat also examines development issues including why Niger has the highest birth rate in the world, can private schools serve some of the poorest kids on the planet and the links between obesity and economic growth.

Prior to becoming the Global Health and Development Correspondent in 2012, Beaubien spent four years based in Mexico City covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. In that role, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

For his first multi-part series as the Mexico City correspondent, Beaubien drove the length of the U.S./Mexico border making a point to touch his toes in both oceans. The stories chronicled the economic, social and political changes along the violent frontier.

In 2002, Beaubien joined NPR after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Over the next four years, Beaubien worked as a foreign correspondent in sub-Saharan Africa, visiting 27 countries on the continent. His reporting ranged from poverty on the world's poorest continent, the HIV in the epicenter of the epidemic, and the all-night a cappella contests in South Africa, to Afro-pop stars in Nigeria and a trial of white mercenaries in Equatorial Guinea.

During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. Beaubien was one of the first journalists to report on the huge exodus of people out of Sudan's Darfur region into Chad, as villagers fled some of the initial attacks by the Janjawid. He reported extensively on the steady deterioration of Zimbabwe and still has a collection of worthless Zimbabwean currency.

In 2006, Beaubien was awarded a Knight-Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan to study the relationship between the developed and the developing world.

Beaubien grew up in Maine, started his radio career as an intern at NPR Member Station KQED in San Francisco and worked at WBUR in Boston before joining NPR.

Story Archive

An artist who goes by the name Jamesy Jay paints a mural of slain Haitian president Jovenel Moïse on the road leading to the president's private residence above Port-au-Prince. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Haitians Hope Assassination Case Will Help Rebuild The Country's Justice System

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Lack Of Security Is The Central Issue Among Haitians After President's Assassination

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Haitian Police Hold President's Palace Security Chief In Assassination Investigation

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Haiti Prepares State Funeral For President As Speculation Around Killing Swirls

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The Power Struggle In Haiti Persists Following Moïse's Assassination

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Conditions In Haiti Remain Tense After Last Week's Presidential Assassination

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Haitian President Moïse's Security Is Under Scrutiny In Murder Investigation

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Sierra Leone's minister of education and chief innovation officer David Moinina Sengeh is a man of many talents. He's using mobile phone technology to improve daily life, he invented a way to make a prosthetic limb with a computer-assisted technique and he's a singer and rapper and a clothing designer, too. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Two American Citizens Among Those Arrested In Haitian President's Assassination

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The challenge of refrigerating COVID-19 vaccines is acute in sub-Saharan Africa, where only 28% of health care facilities have reliable power. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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A Revolutionary Solar Fridge Will Help Keep COVID Vaccines Cold In Sub-Saharan Africa

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Coronavirus Surges Around The World Are Linked To Delta Variant

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An oxygen cylinder plant in Kampala, Uganda. The Ugandan army has started producing oxygen for state-run hospitals to ease the burden existing plants as COVID-19 cases — and demand for oxygen for severe illness — keep rising. Nicholas Kajoba/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Africa Is Running Out Of Oxygen

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Sahr Tarawaly, 14, works several jobs to earn money to support his mom and two siblings. "I used to like mathematics," the round-faced teenager says. "Now I go down to the beach to fish, to have fish to eat." Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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This 14-Year-Old Family Breadwinner Is Part Of The Rise In Child Labor

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