Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien 2010
Stories By

Jason Beaubien

Doby Photography/NPR
Jason Beaubien 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of issues across the world. He's covered the plight of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, mass cataract surgeries in Ethiopia, abortion in El Salvador, poisonous gold mines in Nigeria, drug-resistant malaria in Myanmar and tuberculosis in Tajikistan. He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. His current beat also examines development issues including why Niger has the highest birth rate in the world, can private schools serve some of the poorest kids on the planet and the links between obesity and economic growth.

Prior to becoming the Global Health and Development Correspondent in 2012, Beaubien spent four years based in Mexico City covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. In that role, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

For his first multi-part series as the Mexico City correspondent, Beaubien drove the length of the U.S./Mexico border making a point to touch his toes in both oceans. The stories chronicled the economic, social and political changes along the violent frontier.

In 2002, Beaubien joined NPR after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Over the next four years, Beaubien worked as a foreign correspondent in sub-Saharan Africa, visiting 27 countries on the continent. His reporting ranged from poverty on the world's poorest continent, the HIV in the epicenter of the epidemic, and the all-night a cappella contests in South Africa, to Afro-pop stars in Nigeria and a trial of white mercenaries in Equatorial Guinea.

During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. Beaubien was one of the first journalists to report on the huge exodus of people out of Sudan's Darfur region into Chad, as villagers fled some of the initial attacks by the Janjawid. He reported extensively on the steady deterioration of Zimbabwe and still has a collection of worthless Zimbabwean currency.

In 2006, Beaubien was awarded a Knight-Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan to study the relationship between the developed and the developing world.

Beaubien grew up in Maine, started his radio career as an intern at NPR Member Station KQED in San Francisco and worked at WBUR in Boston before joining NPR.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Gambians are glued to TV and radio as members of a paramilitary that worked with former Gambian President Yahya Jammeh testify before the Truth, Reconciliation and Reparations Commission. The hearings are investigating alleged human rights abuses during Jammeh's tenure in office, from 1994 to 2017. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Samantha Reinders for NPR

Why Everyone In Gambia Is Tuning Into A Broadcast About 'Truth'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/748608015/750314508" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: Democrats Debate, Ebola In Congo

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/747170624/747170625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Health workers in Congo carry the coffins of Ebola victims to a burial site. John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images

Ebola Outbreak In Congo Enters Year 2. Is An End In Sight?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/747012519/747170736" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In 2012, this mother carried her 5-year-old son to a malaria clinic in Thailand from Myanmar. Two new studies find that multidrug-resistant parasites are rendering front-line malaria drugs ineffective in Southeast Asia. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Study: Malaria Drugs Are Failing At An 'Alarming' Rate In Southeast Asia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/742674941/744335686" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Oil production platforms on Venezuela's Lake Maracaibo. Venezuela sits on some of the largest oil reserves in the world. John van Hasselt/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John van Hasselt/Corbis via Getty Images

The Fallout From A Seemingly Sweet Oil Deal For Venezuela's Neighbors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/742677971/743709353" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

WHO Says Ebola Outbreak Is Not An International Threat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/732863488/732863489" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jamaica's Reggae Girlz celebrate winning a penalty kick shootout against Panama to advance to this year's Women's World Cup. Richard W. Rodriguez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Richard W. Rodriguez/AP

Underdog 'Reggae Girlz' Make History at Women's World Cup

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/730413093/730915606" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ranchers In The U.S. And Mexico Hope Tariffs Don't Get In The Way Of Beef Market

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/730429618/730429619" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A 6-month-old baby with measles at San Lazaro Hospital in Manila, Philippines. The country's measles outbreak has been partly driven by distrust of vaccines after a dengue vaccine scandal. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Beaubien/NPR

The Philippines Is Fighting One Of The World's Worst Measles Outbreaks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/725726094/726063936" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Measles Outbreak In The Philippines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/724747890/724747891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Foxtrot and Gemma Snowdon of the U.N.'s World Food Programme, who rescued the lost 4-week-old puppy. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Beaubien/NPR

Lost Pup Finds New Life As Humanitarian Mascot In Refugee Camp

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/714347857/717246127" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Firewood is stacked for sale in a Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh. Local residents complain that the Rohingya have cut down all the trees surrounding the camps and burned them in cooking fires. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Beaubien/NPR

Bangladesh Struggles To Cope With Pressures Of Hosting 1 Million Rohingya Refugees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710256666/715266726" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sodul Amin, 30, is one of tens of thousands of Rohingya refugees who've gotten chickenpox since December. The highly contagious disease spreads easily in the overcrowded refugee camps. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Beaubien/NPR

Chickenpox, The Latest Burden On The Rohingya Refugees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/711743116/712997088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Children play at a Rohingya refugee camp outside Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh. Mahmud Hossain Opu for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Mahmud Hossain Opu for NPR

Rohingya Settle In For The Long Haul, Even As Bangladesh Wants Refugees To Go Home

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/709894267/710398214" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript