Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Jason Beaubien

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Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is a Peabody award-winning journalist. He's filed stories from more than 60 countries around the world. His reporting tends to focus on issues in lower-income countries. Often his reports highlight inequities, injustices and abuses of power. He also regularly writes about natural disasters, wars and human conflict. Over the last two decades he's covered hurricanes in the Caribbean, typhoons in the Philippines, multiple earthquakes in Haiti, the Arab Spring, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the drug war in Mexico.

Beaubien served as NPR's bureau chief in Johannesburg and later in Mexico City. In the early days of the West African Ebola outbreak in 2014 he reported from Sierra Leone. As COVID emerged in 2020 he reported on the start of the pandemic from Hong Kong. His reporting on the Taliban's attempts to derail the multi-billion dollar global effort to eradicate polio won an Edward R Murrow award.

He joined NPR in 2002 after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Previously Beaubien worked at WBUR in Boston and KQED in San Francisco. He lives in Maryland with his family and a rotating cast of goats, chickens, dogs and other animals.

Story Archive

Encore: Drones are a powerful weapon in the Russia-Ukraine war

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A member of a Ukrainian military surveillance team gets ready to launch a drone from a wheat field in southern Ukraine. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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In the Russia-Ukraine war, drones are one of the most powerful weapons

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Despite Russian missiles hitting Kharkiv on nearly a daily basis, 5 of the 18 branches of Bricks Coffee and Desserts in the city have reopened. The head of the coffee shop chain says sales are still far below pre-war levels. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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The war in Ukraine has dramatically affected businesses — big and small

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Twenty-one-year-old Anastacia Shapoval says in Kharkiv right now you have to balance the constant shelling by the Russians with the rest of your life. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Kharkiv is finding a new normal as residents return to work — despite missile strikes

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Encore: Garbage collectors in Kharkiv dodge mortars to pick up the trash

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Workers clean up wreckage at the Amstor Mall in Kremenchuk, Ukraine, after the building was hit by a Russian cruise missile. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Russian missiles are blasting civilians in Ukraine

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Andrey Taranenko drives a municipal garbage truck through the Saltivka neighborhood of Kharkiv. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Garbage collectors in Kharkiv dodge mortars to pick up the trash

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Ukrainian forces have withdrawn from the city of Lysychansk

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The canal that provided water from mainland Ukraine to Crimea, which Ukraine blocked after Russia annexed the peninsula in 2014, is now reopened and flowing. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Russia has achieved at least 1 of its war goals: return Ukraine's water to Crimea

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Business leader turned military commander Vsevolod Kozhemyako stands at a position in Ruska Lozova, a village retaken by the Ukrainian forces in the Kharkiv region, May 16. Ricardo Moraes/Reuters hide caption

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A look inside the Ukrainian 'billionaire's battalion' fighting Russian forces

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Ukraine claims victory in Kharkiv, but some nearby areas face relentless attacks

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