Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien 2010
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Jason Beaubien

Children as young as 7 are among the scavengers at the dump on the outskirts of Honduras' second-largest city, San Pedro Sula. Living conditions in Honduras, already one of the poorest countries in the hemisphere, have worsened since a coup in June removed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

A migrant from Guatemala who did not want to be identified walks along the railroad tracks toward a northern-bound freight train in Guadalajara, Mexico, last month. Carlos Jasso/AP hide caption

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Carlos Jasso/AP

Mexico's Drug Violence Gives Rise To Vigilantism

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Covering more than 750 acres, the sprawling Central de Abasto in Mexico City is billed as Latin America's largest market. Shoppers and vendors here are feeling the effects of the country's economic downturn. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Olive Ridley turtles come ashore to lay their eggs on La Escobilla beach in Oaxaca, Mexico, one of the most important nesting grounds in the world for the creatures. Before the Mexican government instituted a ban on their slaughter, Olive Ridley turtles were harvested nearly to extinction. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Supporters of deposed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya protest Saturday in the El Pedregal neighborhood of Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital. Jose Cabezas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jose Cabezas/AFP/Getty Images

Yolanda Chavarria, 80, stands in front of police officers during a demonstration in support of Honduras' ousted president, Manuel Zelaya, in Tegucigalpa on Monday. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Hondurans Stage Dueling Presidential Protests

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Deposed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya (center) raises his fist surrounded by supporters, at the Brazilian Embassy in Tegucigalpa on Wednesday. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images