Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien 2010
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Jason Beaubien

They're participants in Niger's School for Husbands. Ron Haviv/VII for NPR hide caption

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Ron Haviv/VII for NPR

School For Husbands Gets Men To Talk About Family Size

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This Chinese teenager weighs 353 pounds. At a "slimming center" in China's central Hubei province, he's exercising and undergoing acupuncture to lose weight. Color China/AP hide caption

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The Whole World Is Fat! And That Ends Up Costing $2 Trillion A Year

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A town crier rides his moped through the city of Kayes in Mali, using his megaphone to warn people about Ebola. Nick Loomis/Courtesy of Global Post hide caption

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Nick Loomis/Courtesy of Global Post

Mali Already Has An Ebola Cluster: Can The Virus Be Stopped?

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Red Cross workers in Guinea carry the body of an Ebola victim to a cemetery full of fresh graves for others who have succumbed to the disease. Kristin Palitza/Corbis hide caption

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Air Force personnel put up tents to house a 25-bed, U.S.-built hospital for Liberian health workers sick with Ebola in Monrovia, Liberia's capital. The hospital is scheduled to open this weekend. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Military Response To Ebola Gains Momentum In Liberia

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Don't look for leading Ebola researchers at the Sheraton New Orleans. Louisiana health officials told doctors and scientists who have been in West Africa not to come to a medical meeting in town. Prayitno/Flickr hide caption

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Ebola Researchers Banned From Medical Meeting In New Orleans

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New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (right) and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo both insist on mandatory quarantine for healthcare workers who've had contact with Ebola patients. Christie wants them held in a medical facility; Cuomo says a home quarantine with outside monitoring would do. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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A female sanitation worker wears standard gear for a Doctors Without Borders Ebola center. The outfit includes rubber boots, goggles, a face mask, a hood, three layers of gloves, a Tyvek suit and thick rubber apron. No exposed skin is allowed. She was photographed in Monrovia, Liberia. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Gear Wars: Whose Ebola Protective Suit Is Better?

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Dr. Wvennie MacDonald, the administrator of the JFK Memorial Hospital, has helped put new procedures in place to keep Ebola out, including a triage station to identify possible Ebola patients at the front gate. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Back On Its Feet, A Liberian Hospital Aims To Keep Ebola Out

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Dr. Patrick Kamara adjusts his googles on the final day of training and the first "dress rehearsal" before being sent out to Ebola treatment units. The World Health Organization is ramping up to train up to 500 new health workers a week as part of the effort to stem the spread of Ebola. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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On Front Lines Against Ebola, Training A Matter Of Life Or Death

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Elliott Adekoya, 31, aka The Milkman, is a DJ at Monrovia's Sky FM radio, pictured here his DJ booth. He is also part of a group of 45 Liberian musicians called the Save Liberia Project. They want to get the word out that Ebola is real, but it is not a death sentence. He says that message, which was propagated early on by the Ministry of Health, actually contributed to the problem. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Liberian Singers Use The Power Of Music To Raise Ebola Awareness

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Dr. Gabriel Logan is one of two doctors at the Bomi county hospital, which serves a county of 85,000 people. In a desperate attempt to save Ebola patients, he started experimenting with an HIV drug to treat them. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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A Liberian Doctor Comes Up With His Own Ebola Regimen

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The home of Marthalene Williams, the Ebola-stricken woman aided by Thomas Eric Duncan. A man on the porch, who appeared to be in the late stages of Ebola, informed our photographer that he'd been to a hospital but was told to return home and quarantine himself. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Fond Memories Of Ebola Victim Eric Duncan, Anger Over His Death

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