Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien 2010
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Jason Beaubien

The crowded streets of Kolkata, India, are only going to get more crowded. Randy Olson/National Geographic hide caption

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Randy Olson/National Geographic

11 Billion People By 2100 — And India Will Be More Populous Than China

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Syrian refugees live in makeshift shelters in the Beqaa Valley in Lebanon, just a few miles west of the Syrian border. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Lebanon Evicted Syrians From A Refugee Camp; They Refused To Go

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A baby helps make history. The Kenyan child is receiving the new malaria vaccine — the first ever that can wipe out a parasite — as part of a clinical trial. Karel Prinsloo/AP hide caption

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Karel Prinsloo/AP

Why A Vaccine That Works Only A Third Of The Time Is Still A Good Deal

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Ioanna Mattke holds Raven, one of six hens that her family owns. The Mattkes have raised Raven since she was a day old. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Chicken Owners Brood Over CDC Advice Not To Kiss, Cuddle Birds

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

Who's Still Poor? Who's Made It To Middle Income? Pew Has New Data

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At the health clinic in Minjibir, Nigeria, a child is immunized for polio. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Polio Is Active In Only 3 Countries. Soon It Could Be Down To 2

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A police officer guards the home of a family under a 21-day Ebola quarantine in Freetown, Sierra Leone, back in March. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

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Michael Duff/AP

Why Ebola Won't Go Away In West Africa

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A dangerous nuzzle? A man in western Abu Dhabi hugs a camel brought in from Saudi Arabia for beauty contests. Middle East respiratory syndrome circulates in camels across the Arabian Peninsula. Dave Yoder/National Geographic hide caption

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Dave Yoder/National Geographic

Why MERS Is Likely To Crop Up Outside The Middle East Again

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A student wearing a face mask stands in a public square in Seoul on June 3. More than 200 primary schools shut down as South Korea has struggled to contain an outbreak of the MERS virus. ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images

MERS In South Korea Is Bad News But It's Not Yet Time To Panic

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The man who died of Lassa fever flew from West Africa to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New Jersey Lassa Fever Death Reveals Holes In Ebola Monitoring System

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Patients receive treatment at the Chest Disease Hospital in Srinagar, India. The country has one of the highest rates of drug-resistant tuberculosis in the world, in part because antibiotics for the disease are poorly regulated by the government. Dar Yasin/AP hide caption

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Dar Yasin/AP

As Antibiotic Resistance Spreads, WHO Plans Strategy To Fight It

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The Ebola outbreak "overwhelmed" the World Health Organization and made it clear the agency must change, WHO's director-general, Dr. Margaret Chan, said Monday in Geneva. Fabrice Coffrini /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini /AFP/Getty Images

WHO Calls For $100 Million Emergency Fund, Doctor 'SWAT Team'

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