Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Jason Beaubien

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Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of issues across the world. He's covered the plight of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, mass cataract surgeries in Ethiopia, abortion in El Salvador, poisonous gold mines in Nigeria, drug-resistant malaria in Myanmar and tuberculosis in Tajikistan. He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. His current beat also examines development issues including why Niger has the highest birth rate in the world, can private schools serve some of the poorest kids on the planet and the links between obesity and economic growth.

Prior to becoming the Global Health and Development Correspondent in 2012, Beaubien spent four years based in Mexico City covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. In that role, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

For his first multi-part series as the Mexico City correspondent, Beaubien drove the length of the U.S./Mexico border making a point to touch his toes in both oceans. The stories chronicled the economic, social and political changes along the violent frontier.

In 2002, Beaubien joined NPR after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Over the next four years, Beaubien worked as a foreign correspondent in sub-Saharan Africa, visiting 27 countries on the continent. His reporting ranged from poverty on the world's poorest continent, the HIV in the epicenter of the epidemic, and the all-night a cappella contests in South Africa, to Afro-pop stars in Nigeria and a trial of white mercenaries in Equatorial Guinea.

During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. Beaubien was one of the first journalists to report on the huge exodus of people out of Sudan's Darfur region into Chad, as villagers fled some of the initial attacks by the Janjawid. He reported extensively on the steady deterioration of Zimbabwe and still has a collection of worthless Zimbabwean currency.

In 2006, Beaubien was awarded a Knight-Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan to study the relationship between the developed and the developing world.

Beaubien grew up in Maine, started his radio career as an intern at NPR Member Station KQED in San Francisco and worked at WBUR in Boston before joining NPR.

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A woman receives medication at a clinic offering antiretroviral drugs for HIV patients in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa. STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP via Getty Images

Pretty Mkhabela, a HIV-positive sex worker in South Africa, gets antiretroviral drugs delivered to her house as part of a campaign to maintain treatment for HIV-positive patients during the pandemic. A new drug called cabotegravir could give women more options to protect themselves from HIV infection. Bram Janssen/AP hide caption

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Bram Janssen/AP

A health worker administers a polio vaccine to a child in Afghanistan's Kandahar province. Taliban opposition to vaccine campaigns have left millions of children unprotected against the virus. Javed Tanveer/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Javed Tanveer/AFP via Getty Images

The Campaign To Wipe Out Polio Was Going Really Well ... Until It Wasn't

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The number of people dying from COVID-19 since May 10 is on average 50% higher than every other country in the study, adjusting for population size. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Flight crew members walk past thermal cameras that check passengers' body temperatures at Los Angeles International Airport on June 23. As businesses look to reopen, technology firms are offering an array of monitoring systems to try to control the coronavirus. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

More Companies Are Using Technology To Monitor For Coronavirus In The Workplace

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WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, shown here at a meeting on Monday, has said that the coronavirus death toll is likely higher than the more than 1 million fatalities officially reported. Christopher Black/AP hide caption

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A health worker collects a swab sample from a boy for a coronavirus test at a temporary collection center at a Hindu temple in Hyderabad, the capital of the Indian state of Telangana, on Sept. 30, 2020. Noah Seelam/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Seelam/AFP via Getty Images

Kids And Superspreaders Are Driving COVID-19 Cases In India, Huge Study Finds

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Huda Mohamed, a student at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., has an immunodeficiency. She decided to take extra precautions by using Virginia's COVIDWISE app, which alerts users who may have been exposed to the coronavirus. Such apps are only available in a few states. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

A Tech Powerhouse, U.S. Lags In Using Smartphones For Contact Tracing

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Death Toll From COVID-19 In The U.S. Surpasses 200,000

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Camp Robin Hood in Freedom, N.H., was one of the few around the country to offer a summer sleepover camp. This fall, it's offering a program where students can live and attend classes remotely. Jacob Spiers/Camp Robin Hood hide caption

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Jacob Spiers/Camp Robin Hood

Class Without Coronavirus: Students Take Schoolwork To Sleepaway Camp

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Sleep Away Camps Offer COVID-Free Bubbles For Remote Learning

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