Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Jason Beaubien

Mike Morgan/NPR
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of issues across the world. He's covered the plight of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, mass cataract surgeries in Ethiopia, abortion in El Salvador, poisonous gold mines in Nigeria, drug-resistant malaria in Myanmar and tuberculosis in Tajikistan. He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. His current beat also examines development issues including why Niger has the highest birth rate in the world, can private schools serve some of the poorest kids on the planet and the links between obesity and economic growth.

Prior to becoming the Global Health and Development Correspondent in 2012, Beaubien spent four years based in Mexico City covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. In that role, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

For his first multi-part series as the Mexico City correspondent, Beaubien drove the length of the U.S./Mexico border making a point to touch his toes in both oceans. The stories chronicled the economic, social and political changes along the violent frontier.

In 2002, Beaubien joined NPR after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Over the next four years, Beaubien worked as a foreign correspondent in sub-Saharan Africa, visiting 27 countries on the continent. His reporting ranged from poverty on the world's poorest continent, the HIV in the epicenter of the epidemic, and the all-night a cappella contests in South Africa, to Afro-pop stars in Nigeria and a trial of white mercenaries in Equatorial Guinea.

During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. Beaubien was one of the first journalists to report on the huge exodus of people out of Sudan's Darfur region into Chad, as villagers fled some of the initial attacks by the Janjawid. He reported extensively on the steady deterioration of Zimbabwe and still has a collection of worthless Zimbabwean currency.

In 2006, Beaubien was awarded a Knight-Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan to study the relationship between the developed and the developing world.

Beaubien grew up in Maine, started his radio career as an intern at NPR Member Station KQED in San Francisco and worked at WBUR in Boston before joining NPR.

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The Philippines has begun administering its first batch of Russian Sputnik V vaccines to healthcare workers, elderly citizens, and persons with comorbidities. Manila and nearby provinces remain under strict lockdown as cases of the coronavirus continue to rise. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images hide caption

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Haiti's success is not due to some innovative intervention against the virus. Most people have given up wearing masks in public on the streets of Port-au-Prince and elsewhere. And Haiti hasn't yet administered a single COVID-19 vaccine. Valerie Baeriswyl /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Baeriswyl /AFP via Getty Images

One Of The World's Poorest Countries Has One Of The World's Lowest COVID Death Rates

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Low Global Vaccination Rate Sparks Fears Of COVID-19 Surges

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In Many Parts Of The World, Pandemic Conditions Remain Dire

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EMA Says Benefits Outweigh The Clots Potentially Linked To Johnson & Johnson Vaccine

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European Union Regulator Says Benefits Outweigh Risks Of Johnson & Johnson Vaccine

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Climate activist Greta Thunberg, 18, is adding vaccine inequality to her agenda. In a speech on Monday, she said it was "unethical" to vaccinate young people in rich countries when health workers in low resource countries aren't yet inoculated. WHO/Screengrab by NPR hide caption

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The Ramifications Of The Johnson & Johnson Vaccination Halt Are Global

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Dr. Anike Baptiste receives a dose of J&J from nurse Mokgadi Malebye at a Pretoria hospital last February. South Africa is one of the countries that announced a pause on the J&J vaccine while more research is done into potential blood clots that occurred in younger women after getting the vaccine. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

Several Countries Curb Use Of AstraZeneca Vaccine Use Amid Blood Clot Concerns

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EU Sees Possible Link Between AstraZeneca Vaccine And Blood Clots

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Cubans line up to buy food in Havana on March 3. The island nation is working to develop a vaccine against COVID-19. If successful, the island nation hopes to produce 1 to 2 million doses a month. Yamil Lage/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Cuba's Dream: Come For A Vacation, Get A Homegrown COVID Vaccine

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The State Of Global Vaccination And Vaccination Diplomacy

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Researchers say they may have found a reason for a rare blood clotting condition that has occurred in some people who received the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine. Anatolii Stepanov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Anatolii Stepanov/AFP via Getty Images