Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Jason Beaubien

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Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is a Peabody award-winning journalist. He's filed stories from more than 60 countries around the world. His reporting tends to focus on issues in lower-income countries. Often his reports highlight inequities, injustices and abuses of power. He also regularly writes about natural disasters, wars and human conflict. Over the last two decades he's covered hurricanes in the Caribbean, typhoons in the Philippines, multiple earthquakes in Haiti, the Arab Spring, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the drug war in Mexico.

Beaubien served as NPR's bureau chief in Johannesburg and later in Mexico City. In the early days of the West African Ebola outbreak in 2014 he reported from Sierra Leone. As COVID emerged in 2020 he reported on the start of the pandemic from Hong Kong. His reporting on the Taliban's attempts to derail the multi-billion dollar global effort to eradicate polio won an Edward R Murrow award.

He joined NPR in 2002 after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Previously Beaubien worked at WBUR in Boston and KQED in San Francisco. He lives in Maryland with his family and a rotating cast of goats, chickens, dogs and other animals.

Story Archive

The canal that provided water from mainland Ukraine to Crimea, which Ukraine blocked after Russia annexed the peninsula in 2014, is now reopened and flowing. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Russia has achieved at least 1 of its war goals: return Ukraine's water to Crimea

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Business leader turned military commander Vsevolod Kozhemyako stands at a position in Ruska Lozova, a village retaken by the Ukrainian forces in the Kharkiv region, May 16. Ricardo Moraes/Reuters hide caption

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Ricardo Moraes/Reuters

A look inside the Ukrainian 'billionaire's battalion' fighting Russian forces

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Ukraine claims victory in Kharkiv, but some nearby areas face relentless attacks

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A woman walks through the Oleksiivska station in Kharkiv, Ukraine. Thousands of residents have been sheltering in the city's subway stations, but the mayor says it's safe to emerge now that Russian forces are retreating. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Burned-out Russian tanks stand on the road between Malaya Rohan and Vil'Khivka, Ukraine, just east of Kharkiv. Both villages were in Russian hands for much of March and into April. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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People are picking up the pieces around Kharkiv after liberation by Ukrainian forces

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Ukrainians appear to win the battle in Kharkiv. The mood is far from celebratory

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The latest from Kharkiv, where Ukrainian forces are trying to repel Russian troops

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A music supply store in Bucha lies in ruins after being shelled by Russian forces on March 3. In another part of the same shopping pavilion, other stores, including the Yanta Market coffee shop, are reopening. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Some war-ravaged parts of Ukraine try to rebuild as fighting rages elsewhere

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Some Ukrainian refugees in Poland are now starting to return home

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An update on the global COVID-19 vaccination effort

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Aleksii Simchenko welds together pieces of scrap steel to make a set of plates for body armor. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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In Ukraine, volunteers are making body armor from old cars

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Buying pet lions became a dangerous trend among the wealthy during the pandemic

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