Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Jason Beaubien

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Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is a Peabody award-winning journalist. He's filed stories from more than 60 countries around the world. His reporting tends to focus on issues in lower-income countries. Often his reports highlight inequities, injustices and abuses of power. He also regularly writes about natural disasters, wars and human conflict. Over the last two decades he's covered hurricanes in the Caribbean, typhoons in the Philippines, multiple earthquakes in Haiti, the Arab Spring, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the drug war in Mexico.

Beaubien served as NPR's bureau chief in Johannesburg and later in Mexico City. In the early days of the West African Ebola outbreak in 2014 he reported from Sierra Leone. As COVID emerged in 2020 he reported on the start of the pandemic from Hong Kong. His reporting on the Taliban's attempts to derail the multi-billion dollar global effort to eradicate polio won an Edward R Murrow award.

He joined NPR in 2002 after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Previously Beaubien worked at WBUR in Boston and KQED in San Francisco. He lives in Maryland with his family and a rotating cast of goats, chickens, dogs and other animals.

Story Archive

A burned cot in a police station in Kherson on Wednesday. Kherson residents say Russians used the police station to detain and torture violators of curfew and people suspected of collaborating with Ukrainian authorities. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Screams from Russia's alleged torture basements still haunt Ukraine's Kherson

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Local people react to a volunteer from Odesa distributing aid on the main square in front of the Regional Administration Building in Kherson on Wednesday. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Hanna Malyar, Ukraine's deputy defense minister (center), signs a Ukrainian flag belonging to a local resident in Kherson on Monday. "Ukraine's success depends on two points," Malyar told NPR. "First our strength, our ability to fight. And second, the weapons that we receive from our partners," referring to the United States and other Western nations. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Ukrainians dance in Kherson's streets at the end of Russia's months-long occupation

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Zelenskyy's arrival in Kherson underscores Ukraine's momentum in the war

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In this photo provided by the Ukrainian Presidential Press Office, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, surrounded by his guards, walks on central square during his visit to Kherson on Monday. Ukrainian Presidential Press Office/AP hide caption

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Ukrainian Presidential Press Office/AP

Ukrainian Armed Forces in a tank heading toward the Kherson front in Kherson region on Wednesday. Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

What Russia's announced pullout from Kherson means for the war in Ukraine

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Ukraine is skeptical of Russian claims that it is withdrawing from Kherson

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The Ukrainian artillery battery of the 59th Mechanized Brigade fires a howitzer at points controlled by Russian troops in Kherson Oblast, Ukraine on Saturday. Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Russia says it's withdrawing from the key city of Kherson, but Ukraine is skeptical

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Iran acknowledges sending military drones to Russia before the invasion of Ukraine

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This undated photograph released by the Ukrainian military's Strategic Communications Directorate shows the wreckage of what Kyiv has described as an Iranian Shahed drone downed near Kupiansk, Ukraine. Iran has acknowledged for the first time that it sent drones to Russia but says the delivery happened before the invasion of Ukraine. Ukrainian military's Strategic Communications Directorate via AP hide caption

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Ukrainian military's Strategic Communications Directorate via AP

For the first time, Iran acknowledges it sent drones to Russia

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Millions of Ukrainians left without electricity after Russian strikes

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Ukrainian troops continue counteroffensive in regional capital seized by Russians

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Andriy and Iryna Grycenko (center) mourn the death of their 11-year-old daughter, Anastasiya, at her funeral in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Sept. 20. Anastasiya was killed on Sept. 17 when a Russian S-300 missile obliterated her home in Chuhuiv. At right is Iryna's sister, Anastasiya's aunt, Rimma Leiba. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Ukrainians grieve for an 11-year-old girl killed by a Russian missile

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After Russia destroyed water supply, Mykolaiv is struggling to get clean water

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An 11-year-old girl was among the casualties in Russia's strikes across Ukraine

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