Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Jason Beaubien

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Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of issues across the world. He's covered the plight of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, mass cataract surgeries in Ethiopia, abortion in El Salvador, poisonous gold mines in Nigeria, drug-resistant malaria in Myanmar and tuberculosis in Tajikistan. He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. His current beat also examines development issues including why Niger has the highest birth rate in the world, can private schools serve some of the poorest kids on the planet and the links between obesity and economic growth.

Prior to becoming the Global Health and Development Correspondent in 2012, Beaubien spent four years based in Mexico City covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. In that role, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

For his first multi-part series as the Mexico City correspondent, Beaubien drove the length of the U.S./Mexico border making a point to touch his toes in both oceans. The stories chronicled the economic, social and political changes along the violent frontier.

In 2002, Beaubien joined NPR after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Over the next four years, Beaubien worked as a foreign correspondent in sub-Saharan Africa, visiting 27 countries on the continent. His reporting ranged from poverty on the world's poorest continent, the HIV in the epicenter of the epidemic, and the all-night a cappella contests in South Africa, to Afro-pop stars in Nigeria and a trial of white mercenaries in Equatorial Guinea.

During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. Beaubien was one of the first journalists to report on the huge exodus of people out of Sudan's Darfur region into Chad, as villagers fled some of the initial attacks by the Janjawid. He reported extensively on the steady deterioration of Zimbabwe and still has a collection of worthless Zimbabwean currency.

In 2006, Beaubien was awarded a Knight-Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan to study the relationship between the developed and the developing world.

Beaubien grew up in Maine, started his radio career as an intern at NPR Member Station KQED in San Francisco and worked at WBUR in Boston before joining NPR.

Story Archive

WHO is trying to start outlining international rules for COVID outbreaks

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A patient with tuberculosis waits to be seen by a doctor at the Sizwe Tropical Diseases Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. Annual deaths from the infectious disease are on the rise after years of progress. Michele Spatari /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Spatari /AFP via Getty Images

WHO's new team will investigate the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic

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The World Health Organization approves the first malaria vaccine

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A nurse administers the world's first malaria vaccine during a 2019 pilot program in Ghana. The World Health Organization has now recommended the vaccine for use in countries with moderate to high levels of malaria transmission. Cristina Aldehuela/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Cristina Aldehuela/AFP via Getty Images

WHO greenlights the world's first malaria vaccine — but it's not a perfect shot

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The world's 1st malaria vaccine gets a green light from the World Health Organization

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The Pandora Papers cite a number of leaders from lower-income countries or nations with great levels of inequality, among them Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev (from left), Chilean President Sebastián Piñera and Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta. Anadolu Agency via Getty Images, Bloomberg, Ludovic Marin/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency via Getty Images, Bloomberg, Ludovic Marin/Getty Images

A report by the World Health Organization this week detailed 83 allegations of sexual abuse by its employees during the Ebola crisis that began in 2018 in the Democratic Republic of Congo. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus called it a "dark day" for the U.N. body. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

Are COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters Necessary?

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The Earthquake Left Thousands Of Haitians Injured And Homeless. Many Still Need Aid

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Hundreds of people are living in a makeshift tent city inside the main soccer stadium in Les Cayes, Haiti, following the 7.2 magnitude earthquake. Octavio Jones for NPR hide caption

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Octavio Jones for NPR

Haitians Who Have Lost Their Homes Are Living On A Muddy Soccer Field

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