Jason Beaubien Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Jason Beaubien

Mike Morgan/NPR
Jason Beaubien, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of issues across the world. He's covered the plight of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, mass cataract surgeries in Ethiopia, abortion in El Salvador, poisonous gold mines in Nigeria, drug-resistant malaria in Myanmar and tuberculosis in Tajikistan. He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. His current beat also examines development issues including why Niger has the highest birth rate in the world, can private schools serve some of the poorest kids on the planet and the links between obesity and economic growth.

Prior to becoming the Global Health and Development Correspondent in 2012, Beaubien spent four years based in Mexico City covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. In that role, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

For his first multi-part series as the Mexico City correspondent, Beaubien drove the length of the U.S./Mexico border making a point to touch his toes in both oceans. The stories chronicled the economic, social and political changes along the violent frontier.

In 2002, Beaubien joined NPR after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Over the next four years, Beaubien worked as a foreign correspondent in sub-Saharan Africa, visiting 27 countries on the continent. His reporting ranged from poverty on the world's poorest continent, the HIV in the epicenter of the epidemic, and the all-night a cappella contests in South Africa, to Afro-pop stars in Nigeria and a trial of white mercenaries in Equatorial Guinea.

During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. Beaubien was one of the first journalists to report on the huge exodus of people out of Sudan's Darfur region into Chad, as villagers fled some of the initial attacks by the Janjawid. He reported extensively on the steady deterioration of Zimbabwe and still has a collection of worthless Zimbabwean currency.

In 2006, Beaubien was awarded a Knight-Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan to study the relationship between the developed and the developing world.

Beaubien grew up in Maine, started his radio career as an intern at NPR Member Station KQED in San Francisco and worked at WBUR in Boston before joining NPR.

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What U.S. Vaccine Donations Mean For Sierra Leone And Africa

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Twitter Remains Shut Down In Nigeria After Deleting President's Tweet

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Children of about 6,000 ethnic Fulanis who have been displaced by attacks gather in a makeshift camp in Youba, Burkina Faso, in April 2020. The West African nation continues to be racked by violence linked to Islamic extremists and local defense militias. Sam Mednick/AP hide caption

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Sam Mednick/AP

Burkina Faso Will Observe 3 Days Of Mourning After Weekend Massacre

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Vaccine Rollout Remains Highly Uneven Worldwide

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From left: A New Delhi woman waits in an observation room after getting the Covishield vaccine (the name used for the AstraZeneca vaccine in India) on May 26. U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves a vaccination center after his first AstraZeneca dose on March 19. On March 9, Nairobi, Kenya, began vaccinating groups, including health care workers and older people, with the AstraZeneca vaccine. From left: Prakash Singh, Aaron Chown, Robert Bonet/Getty Images hide caption

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From left: Prakash Singh, Aaron Chown, Robert Bonet/Getty Images

It's The Vaccine That's Lost A Lot Of Trust. But AstraZeneca Still Has Its Fans

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A patient rests at the COVID ward of the regional hospital in Leova, Moldova, on March 23. Moldova remains one of the poorest countries in Europe and has relied on vaccine donations from Romania and COVAX, a program that aims to distribute the world's vaccines more equitably. Daniel Mihailescu /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Mihailescu /AFP via Getty Images

'It's The Right Thing To Do': Biden Announces U.S. To Share Vaccine Doses Globally

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The Philippines has begun administering its first batch of Russian Sputnik V vaccines to healthcare workers, elderly citizens, and persons with comorbidities. Manila and nearby provinces remain under strict lockdown as cases of the coronavirus continue to rise. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

Haiti's success is not due to some innovative intervention against the virus. Most people have given up wearing masks in public on the streets of Port-au-Prince and elsewhere. And Haiti hasn't yet administered a single COVID-19 vaccine. Valerie Baeriswyl /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Baeriswyl /AFP via Getty Images

One Of The World's Poorest Countries Has One Of The World's Lowest COVID Death Rates

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Low Global Vaccination Rate Sparks Fears Of COVID-19 Surges

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In Many Parts Of The World, Pandemic Conditions Remain Dire

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EMA Says Benefits Outweigh The Clots Potentially Linked To Johnson & Johnson Vaccine

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