Elizabeth Blair Elizabeth Blair is a Peabody Award-winning Senior Producer/Reporter on the Arts Desk at NPR.
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Elizabeth Blair

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Elizabeth Blair 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Elizabeth Blair

Senior Producer/Reporter, Arts Desk

Elizabeth Blair is a Peabody Award-winning senior producer/reporter on the Arts Desk of NPR News.

Blair produces, edits, and reports arts and cultural segments for NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition. In this position, she has reported on a range of topics from arts funding to the MeToo movement. She has profiled renowned artists such as Yayoi Kusama and Mikhail Baryshnikov, explored how old women are represented in fairy tales, and reported the origins of the children's classic Curious George. Among her all-time favorite interviews are actors Octavia Spencer and Andy Serkis, comedians Bill Burr and Hari Kondabolu, the rapper K'Naan, and Cookie Monster (in character).

Blair has overseen several, large-scale series including The NPR 100, which explored landmark musical works of the 20th Century, and In Character, which probed the origins of iconic American fictional characters. Along with her colleagues on the Arts Desk and at NPR Music, Blair curated American Anthem, a major series exploring the origins of songs that uplift, rouse, and unite people around a common theme.

Blair's work has received several honors, including two Peabody Awards and a Gracie. She previously lived in Paris, France, where she co-produced Le Jazz Club From Paris with Dee Dee Bridgewater, and the monthly magazine Postcard From Paris.

Story Archive

Artis Stevens, president and CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, says MacKenzie's Scott's gift to the mentoring organization will be "transformative." Big Brothers Big Sisters of America hide caption

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Big Brothers Big Sisters of America

More TV shows depict abortion but few resemble real life

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Skylar Tang, a 16-year-old from the San Francisco Bay area, is the winner of the Dr. J. Douglas White Composing & Arranging Contest. John Clayton/ Skylar Tang hide caption

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John Clayton/ Skylar Tang

Who says big band jazz is for old people? Not this teenage composer.

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More TV shows depict abortion but few resemble real life

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Actress Bea Arthur (left) portrayed the title character of Maude in the 1970s. Gina Rodriguez starred in Jane the Virgin. Both of their characters had a decision to make about abortion. Reg Innell/Toronto Star via Getty Images; JB Lacroix/Getty Images hide caption

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Reg Innell/Toronto Star via Getty Images; JB Lacroix/Getty Images

TV has brought the abortion debate home since the 1970s

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Jon Stewart accepts the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. Scott Suchman/The Kennedy Center hide caption

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Scott Suchman/The Kennedy Center

Jon Stewart says the 'fragility of leaders' is the real threat to humor

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Doubleday Books for Young Readers

As 'The Velveteen Rabbit' turns 100, its message continues to resonate

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Graphic novelist George O'Connor treats the Olympians as both a family and as distinct gods and goddesses, each with their own personality. Macmillan Children's Publishing Group / First Second hide caption

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Macmillan Children's Publishing Group / First Second

Graphic novels about Greek gods that don't talk down to kids

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