Elizabeth Blair Elizabeth Blair is a Correspondent for NPR's Culture Desk
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Elizabeth Blair

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Elizabeth Blair 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Elizabeth Blair

Correspondent, Culture Desk

Elizabeth Blair is a Cultural Trends Correspondent for NPR.

Blair has reported on a range of topics from arts funding to the MeToo movement. She has profiled renowned artists such as Yayoi Kusama and Mikhail Baryshnikov, explored how old women are represented in fairy tales, and reported the origins of the children's classic Curious George. Among her all-time favorite interviews are actors Octavia Spencer and Andy Serkis, comedians Bill Burr and Hari Kondabolu, the rapper K'Naan, and Cookie Monster (in character).

Blair has overseen several, large-scale series including The NPR 100, which explored landmark musical works of the 20th Century, and In Character, which probed the origins of iconic American fictional characters. Along with her colleagues on the Arts Desk and at NPR Music, Blair curated American Anthem, a major series exploring the origins of songs that uplift, rouse, and unite people around a common theme.

Blair's work has received several honors, including two Peabody Awards and a Gracie. She previously lived in Paris, France, where she co-produced Le Jazz Club From Paris with Dee Dee Bridgewater, and the monthly magazine Postcard From Paris.

Story Archive

Thursday

Rod with his father Sam Serling c. 1943. Esther Cooper Serling/Courtesy of Anne Serling hide caption

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Esther Cooper Serling/Courtesy of Anne Serling

A WWII story by The Twilight Zone's Rod Serling is published for the first time

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Tuesday

Playwright Ayad Akhtar on stage at the 2023 PEN America Literary Awards in his role as then-president of the organization. Beowulf Sheehan/PEN America hide caption

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Beowulf Sheehan/PEN America

Tuesday

Founded by brothers Pat and Lolly Vegas, Redbone scored a Top 5 hit in 1974 with "Come and Get Your Love," launching their Indigenous style and influences into the pop conversation. Sandy Speiser/Courtesy of Sony Legacy hide caption

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Sandy Speiser/Courtesy of Sony Legacy

50 years ago, 'Come and Get Your Love' put Native culture on the bandstand

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Tuesday

Here's the shortlist of authors for the Carol Shields Prize for Fiction. The winner will be announced in Toronto on May 13th. McClelland & Stewart/Random House/Doubleday Canada/SJP Lit hide caption

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McClelland & Stewart/Random House/Doubleday Canada/SJP Lit

Tuesday

Remembering musician Casey Benjamin of the Robert Glasper Experiment, dead at 45

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Wednesday

Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Conn., celebrated leaving its home of nearly 60 years with a community parade on Oct. 15, 2022. "The entire city is now our stage," said artistic director Jacob Padrón. Lotta Studio/Long Wharf Theatre hide caption

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Lotta Studio/Long Wharf Theatre

Monday

Kevin Hart received the 25th annual Mark Twain Prize for American Humor at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. on March 24th, 2024. The Kennedy Center hide caption

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The Kennedy Center

Kevin Hart takes home his Mark Twain Prize for American humor

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Tuesday

The 92nd Street Y, New York is celebrating its 150th anniversary. As a Jewish cultural institution, it's also facing criticism related to the Israel-Hamas war. 92NY hide caption

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92NY

92NY, a historic cultural center, turns 150 — grappling with today's Israel-Hamas war

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Wednesday

American Airlines has announced the passing of Capt. David E. Harris. In 1964, Harris became the first Black pilot of a commercial airline when American hired him. American Airlines hide caption

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American Airlines

The first Black pilot of a commercial airline has died at 89

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Friday

Alyssa Milano says that celebrity activism is at its best "when we are able to hand over the microphone" to the "incredible heroes" doing activism work day to day. She's pictured above in July 2018 at a protest following President Trump's meetings with Russia's Vladimir Putin. A longtime activist, Milano says it's impossible to avoid "the vitriol," especially when talking about the Middle East. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

When celebrities show up to protest, the media follows — but so does the backlash

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Tuesday

Grammy winner SZA performs onstage at Spotify's Night of Music party at Anaheim Convention Center on June 25, 2022. SZA's Kill Bill is among the new round of songs to be removed from TikTok. Anna Webber/Getty Images for Spotify hide caption

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Anna Webber/Getty Images for Spotify

Thursday

A 19th century taste test. Carole Bethuel/IFC Films hide caption

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Carole Bethuel/IFC Films

The 'food' you see on-screen often isn't real food. Not so, in 'The Taste of Things'

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Friday

Maurice Sendak delights children with new book, 12 years after his death

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Thursday

Wednesday

In her new book Get the Picture, journalist Bianca Bosker explores why connecting with art sometimes feels harder than it has to be. Above, a visitor takes in paintings at The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition in London in 2010. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

How the art world excludes you and what you can do about it

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Tuesday

HarperCollins Publishers

Maurice Sendak delights children with new book, 12 years after his death

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Thursday

Olivia Rodrigo performs in concert during a taping of the "Austin City Limits" TV show at ACL Live on Oct. 2, 2021, in Austin, Texas. Amy Harris/Invision/AP hide caption

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Amy Harris/Invision/AP

Tuesday

Policy makers, arts advocates, community leaders and artists attended "Healing, Bridging, Thriving," the first-ever White House summit on arts and culture in Washington, D.C. Shutterstock on behalf of the NEA hide caption

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Shutterstock on behalf of the NEA

Thursday

Fellow standups come to Jo Koy's defense after Golden Globes

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Tuesday

Monday

With songs by The Avett Brothers, Swept Away is inspired by the true story of an 19th century shipwreck in which seamen resorted to cannibalism to survive. Julieta Cervantes/Arena Stage hide caption

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Julieta Cervantes/Arena Stage

Truth, forgiveness: 'Swept Away' is a theatrical vessel for Avett Bros' music

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