Peter Breslow Peabody Award-winner Peter Breslow is a senior producer for NPR's newsmagazine Weekend Edition.
Peter Breslow 2010
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Peter Breslow

Doby Photography/NPR
Peter Breslow 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Peter Breslow

Senior Producer, Weekend Edition

Two-time Peabody Award-winner Peter Breslow is a senior producer for NPR's newsmagazine Weekend Edition. He has been with the program since 1992. Prior to that, he was a producer for NPR's All Things Considered.

Breslow has reported and produced from around the country and the world --from Mt. Everest to the South Pole. During his career he has covered conflicts in close to a dozen countries, had his microphone splattered with rattlesnake venom, and played hockey underwater. For six years, he was the supervising senior producer of Weekend Edition Saturday, managing that program's news coverage.

Over the years, Breslow has been honored with three Overseas Press Club awards: 1989 for "Homecoming: Return to Vietnam," 1998 for "Israel at 50," and 1999 for NPR's Kosovo coverage. Among his other awards are a share of the 2002 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for NPR's coverage of Sept. 11 and the war in Afghanistan, and the 2003 duPont-Columbia Award for NPR's coverage of the war in Iraq. He also received a William Benton Fellowship in Broadcast Journalism from the University of Chicago.

In 1988, Breslow won a coveted Peabody Award for his series of reports, "Cowboys on Everest." Microphone in hand, he joined members of the Wyoming Centennial Expedition as they scaled the snow and ice up 23,000 feet on Mount Everest's North Ridge. He was also part of the NPR team that was awarded a Peabody in 2014 for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in Africa.

A native of River Edge, New Jersey, Breslow plays the harmonica, worships Muddy Waters, is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, and an Eagle Scout.

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Let's Rock, The Black Keys' first album in five years, returns to the stripped-down, chugging blues-rock of the duo's early days. Alysse Gafkjen/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alysse Gafkjen/Courtesy of the artist

After Years Apart, The Black Keys Get Back To Basics

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Bandits on the Run, composed of members Adrian Enscoe, Sydney Shepherd and Regina Strayhorn, submitted a stand-out video to the 2019 Tiny Desk Contest. Sophia Schrank/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sophia Schrank/Courtesy of the artist

These Tiny Desk Contest Entrants Bring Mini-Symphonies To The NYC Subway

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March 1950: Louis Armstrong plays trumpet in his dressing room before a show in New York. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Satchmo In His Adolescence: 1915 Film Clip May Show Young Louis Armstrong

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Claudio Gage poses for a portrait at the Hola Code offices in Mexico City on May 13. Gage was deported to Mexico after having lived in the U.S. for more than a decade. Alicia Vera for NPR hide caption

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Alicia Vera for NPR

In Mexico, New Groups Offer Aid To A Young Generation Of Deported DREAMers

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In his home in León, Olivas-Bejarano looks through an album with photographs of his time in the United States. Alicia Vera for NPR hide caption

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Alicia Vera for NPR

Deported After Living In The U.S. For 26 Years, He Navigates A New Life In Mexico

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Salvador Dalí­'s idea for a Marx Brothers movie was never made — but it's been resurrected as a graphic novel. Quirk Books hide caption

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Quirk Books

Salvador Dalí Meets The Marx Brothers In 'Giraffes On Horseback Salad'

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"I just sing what I feel," Mary Lane says. Collin Susich /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Collin Susich /Courtesy of the artist

At 83, Mary Lane Upholds The Blues Tradition: 'I Still Got It'

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Mimi Lesseos has been working in the field of stunt performance for decades. Now, at age 54 and still working, she wants to pass on the riches of her experience. Courtesy of Mimi Lesseos hide caption

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Courtesy of Mimi Lesseos

After Living Dozens Of Lives, Leading Stuntwoman Mimi Lesseos Has Lessons To Offer

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Marcia Ball Mary Bruton/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Mary Bruton/Courtesy of the artist

Marcia Ball Looks Back On Her Blues Legacy: 'I'm Perfectly Suited For The Job'

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Johnny Cash: Forever Words is available now. Don Hunstein (c) Sony Music/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Don Hunstein (c) Sony Music/Courtesy of the artist

'Just As True': Johnny Cash's Poems Set To Music For New Album

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Habibi Bailey Robb/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Bailey Robb/Courtesy of the artist

Habibi Fuses Farsi Lyrics With Western Riffs

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Michael Hearst's Songs For Extraordinary People is available now. Franck Bohbot/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Franck Bohbot/Courtesy of the artist

A Selection Of Songs For The Extraordinary

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The Miraculous Love Kids music school founder Lanny Cordola (top left) stands with Madina Mohammadi (top center), Mursal (top right) and other students outside their rehearsal space in Kabul. Their favorite song is "Fragile" by Sting. "What we're trying to do with music is not singing and dancing and fancy stuff," Cordola says. "You know, these are songs of compassion and hope and healing." Peter Breslow/NPR hide caption

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Peter Breslow/NPR

An American Rock Musician Teaches Guitar To Kabul's Street Kids

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Rodney Stotts walks across the roof of the Matthew Henson Earth Conservation Center with one of his hawks. A former drug dealer, he is now a falconer — one of only 30 African-American falconers in the U.S., he says. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Washington, D.C., A Program In Which Birds And People Lift Each Other Up

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Otis Redding performs on the TV show Ready Steady Go in 1966. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Otis Redding's 'Unfinished Life' Still Resonates

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