Cheryl Corley Cheryl Corley is a NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk and is based in Chicago. She travels throughout the Midwest covering issues and events throughout the region's 12 states.
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Cheryl Corley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Cheryl Corley

Correspondent, National Desk, Chicago

Cheryl Corley is an NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk and is based in Chicago. She travels throughout the Midwest covering issues and events throughout the region's 12 states.

In recent years, Corley has reported on the campaign and re-election of President Barack Obama, on the efforts by Illinois officials to rethink the state's Juvenile Justice System, on youth violence in Chicago, and on political turmoil in the Illinois state government. She's reported on the infamous Trayvon Martin shooting case in Florida and covered tornadoes that have destroyed homes and claimed lives in Harrisburg, Illinois; small towns in Oklahoma; and Joplin, Missouri.

In addition, Corley was among the group of NPR reporters covering the devastation caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita as they tore through the Gulf Coast. She returned to the area, five years later, and joined the reporting team covering the impact of the BP oil spill. Corley also has served as a fill-in host for NPR shows, including Weekend All Things Considered, Tell Me More, and Morning Edition.

Prior to joining NPR, Corley was the news director at Chicago's public radio station, WBEZ, where she supervised an award-winning team of reporters. She also has been a frequent panelist on television news-affairs programs in Chicago.

Corley has received awards for her work from a number of organizations including the National Association of Black Journalists, the Associated Press, the Public Radio News Directors Association, and the Society of Professional Journalists. She earned the Community Media Workshop's Studs Terkel Award for excellence in reporting on Chicago's diverse communities and a Herman Kogan Award for reporting on immigration issues.

A Chicago native, Corley graduated cum laude from Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois, and is now a Bradley University trustee. While in Peoria, Corley worked as a reporter and news director for public radio station WCBU and as a television director for the NBC affiliate, WEEK-TV. She is a past President of the Association for Women Journalists in Chicago.

She is also the co-creator of the Cindy Bandle Young Critics Program. The critics/journalism training program for female high school juniors is a collaboration between AWJ-Chicago and the Goodman Theatre. Corley has also served as a board member of Community Television Network, an organization that trains Chicago youth in video and multi-media production.

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Story Archive

Jason Van Dyke Found Guilty In Murder Of Laquan McDonald

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Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, center, attends a hearing at the Leighton Criminal Court Building, in Chicago. Antonio Perez/AP hide caption

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Chicago Police Officer Goes On Trial For Murder Of Black Teen

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Aretha Franklin's homegoing service was held at Greater Grace Temple in Detroit. This sign sat on a hearse outside of the church. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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A Funeral Fit For A 'Queen'

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A pink Cadillac outside the viewing of Aretha Franklin at the Detroit's Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History on Tuesday. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pink Cadillacs Will Line Up For Aretha Franklin's Funeral

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U.S. Inmates Plan Nationwide Prison Strike To Protest Labor Conditions

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Chicago Battles Its Image As Murder Capital Of The Nation

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A bystander watches as Chicago police investigate a street where multiple people were shot on Sunday. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Has A 'Heavy Heart' After Dozens Wounded In 33 Shootings Last Weekend

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A bystander watches as Chicago police investigates a street where multiple people were shot on Sunday in Chicago. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Officials Ask People To Speak Up After A Dozen Killed In Weekend Shooting

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Anti-Violence Protesters To Shut Down Chicago's Lake Shore Drive

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Chief of Security Joe Charvat walks the halls of the state penitentiary's Behavior Intervention Unit (BIU) — the prison's name for solitary confinement. Typically there are about 20 inmates in the cells, far fewer than in previous years. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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North Dakota Prison Officials Think Outside The Box To Revamp Solitary Confinement

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Fatal Police Shooting In Chicago Highlights Tense Relationship In The City

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