Cheryl Corley Cheryl Corley is a Chicago-based NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk. She primarily covers criminal justice issues as well as breaking news in the Midwest and across the country.
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Cheryl Corley

Occupy Chicago: A 'Dry Run' For Upcoming Summits

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Many homeowners find they can't sell their homes so instead they reluctantly become landlords. courtneyk/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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courtneyk/iStockphoto.com

Would-Be Sellers Become Reluctant Landlords

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This small juvenile skunk was caught by Des Plaines, Ill., homeowner Richard Kaulback. He says there have always been raccoons and opossums in the Chicago area, but this year, skunks have become prolific. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Chicago-Area Skunk Population Raises A Stink

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Circulation figures for Johnson Publishing's flagship Ebony and Jet magazines are up substantially in recent months. NPR hide caption

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'Ebony,' 'Jet' Parent Takes A Bold New Tack

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Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, shown in his office earlier this month, will mark 100 days in office on Tuesday. The former congressman and White House chief of staff says that as mayor, "you get a way to make decisions about topics that are close to home in the way people live their lives." M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Michael Harvey's novels focus on cop-turned-P.I. Michael Kelly and his life and work in the Windy City. Citizen Erased! via Flikr hide caption

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Citizen Erased! via Flikr

P.I. Kelly: Hot On The Trail Of Crime In Chicago

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Rahm Emanuel celebrated with supporters at the Journeymen Plumbers' Union Local 130 Hall after winning the mayoral election in February. Now, Emanuel is in a test of wills with unions over closing the city's massive budget gap. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Nancy Matthews (left) and Lisa Frohman (right) traveled out of state to adopt their son, Eli. They say the new Illinois civil union law will make it easier for gay and lesbian couples who don't want to hide their sexuality as they try to adopt. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Isaac Manchester Farm in Avella, Pa. National Trust for Historic Preservation hide caption

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National Trust for Historic Preservation

Places In Peril: 2011's Most Endangered Historic Sites

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Nora Fiffer and Chance Bone of Chicago's Lookingglass Theatre in the company's current production of The Last Act of Lilka Kadison. Sean Williams hide caption

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Sean Williams

Mark Darrow, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., keeps watch by looking for evidence of tornadoes, heavy winds and damaging hail. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP