Cheryl Corley Cheryl Corley is a Chicago-based NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk. She primarily covers criminal justice issues as well as breaking news in the Midwest and across the country.
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Cheryl Corley

Former juvenile-lifers Johnny Alexander (left, in cap) and Edward Sanders, second from right, work with staff and students to learn how to check their credit scores at a workshop run by Michigan's State Appellate Defenders Office or SADO. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Once Sentenced For Life, Some Juvenile Convicts Get A Second Chance

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Members of the San Leandro Police Department SWAT Team during a planned training exercise in 2013. The FBI has been monitoring "swatting" — made-up crimes called in to 911 that are designed to get SWAT teams to deploy — for nearly 10 years. Stephen Lam/Reuters hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Reuters

Big Tech Improvements To 911 System Raise The Risk Of More 'Swatting'

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ATF police in June in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Court Decision Could Force Changes To ATF's Undercover Operations

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Leonard Gipson, one of 15 men who say corrupt Chicago police framed them and whose convictions were thrown out, talks to reporters Thursday. Teresa Crawford/AP hide caption

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Teresa Crawford/AP

Chicago Judge Throws Out 15 Convictions On Fears Police Reports Were Dishonest

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People walk past the Cook County Criminal Courts Building in April 2012. Public Defender Amy Campanelli wants sheriff's deputies to monitor the lockup areas to prevent men in custody from exposing themselves to female attorneys. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Andrea J. Ritchie is a black lesbian immigrant, police misconduct attorney, and 2014 Senior Soros Justice Fellow. She is currently researcher-in-residence on Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Criminalization at the Barnard Center for Research on Women. W.C. Moss/Beacon Press hide caption

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W.C. Moss/Beacon Press

Ritchie reads from her book

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New Use-Of-Force Guidelines For Chicago Police

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This is a Nov. 17, 1967 file photo of former president Lyndon B. Johnson. That year a commission Johnson had organized to come up with recommendations for how to win his "war on crime" issued their report. The legacy of some of those recommendations can be seen today. AP hide caption

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AP

Harvey's housing prospects got a big boost in 2005 with the Greenview Manor subdivison. The tri-level homes on Harvey's west side have 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and 2-car garages. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Once A Blue-Collar Powerhouse, A Chicago Suburb Now Faces A Dim Future

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After 2 Years, Illinois Passes A Budget

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A police officer stands near the site where Officer Miosotis Familia was killed. Familia was shot to death early Wednesday, ambushed inside her command post by an ex-convict, authorities said. He was later killed after pulling a gun on police. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Police Fatalities On The Rise

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Sales Are Slow For Trump Condos In Chicago

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Chicago Could Lose Federal Funds Under Scope Of 'Sanctuary Cities' Order

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For Some Moms, Posting Bail Means They Can Spend Mother's Day With Their Families

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