Cheryl Corley Cheryl Corley is a NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk and is based in Chicago. She travels throughout the Midwest covering issues and events throughout the region's 12 states.
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Cheryl Corley

Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis speaks outside Mahalia Jackson Elementary School in Chicago about the planned closing of 54 public schools. Opponents say the plan will disproportionately affect minority students in the nation's third-largest school district. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Chicago Teachers, Parents Riled By Plan To Close 54 Public Schools

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Mississippi State's Stan Brinker (53) and Loyola's Jerry Harkness (15) shake hands before the NCAA Mideast regional semifinal college basketball game in East Lansing, Mich., on March 15, 1963. The game was a landmark contest between the schools that helped alter race relations on the basketball court. Loyola University Chicago/AP hide caption

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Loyola University Chicago/AP

Branndin Laramore (from left), Brian Weddington, Lia Miller and Ernesto Moreta pose after a recent rehearsal for the Chicago finals of the August Wilson Monologue Competition. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

August Wilson's Words Get New Life In Monologue Contest

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Steve Harvey on the set of his Steve Harvey Show in Chicago just before it debuted in September 2012. Chuck Hodes/AP/NBC hide caption

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Chuck Hodes/AP/NBC

Obama To Push State Of The Union Messages In Chicago

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Minute Suite's 7-by-8-feet rooms offer Wi-Fi, a sofa bed, a television and a workspace. One traveler compared the small spaces to having an MRI done, but others say the idea is overdue at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. Courtesy of Minute Suites hide caption

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Courtesy of Minute Suites

The remains of Hadiya Pendleton are taken to her final resting place at the Cedar Park Cemetery on Saturday in Calumet Park, Ill. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

First Lady Among Mourners At Funeral For Slain Chicago Teen

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Shirley Chambers cries during Monday's funeral for her son Ronnie Chambers, 33. She had four children, three boys and a girl, all victims of gun violence in Chicago over a period of 18 years. John Gress/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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John Gress/Reuters/Landov

Community leaders and family members of murder victims attend a press conference Jan. 3 at St. Sabina Church in Chicago to make a plea for stronger gun regulations. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Urooj Khan poses with a winning lottery ticket. He died after winning a $1 million lottery in Chicago. Forensic pathologists at first said Khan died of natural causes, but that ruling was later changed to death by cyanide poisoning. AP hide caption

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AP